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Figure S1: Patient 1 at 9 years 4 months. (a) Axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) at the level of the pons revealing severe hypoplasia of the right cerebellar hemisphere, hypoplasia and dysplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere, and an enlargement of the posterior fossa. (b) Axial T2-weighted MRI at the level of the mesencephalon showing severe hypoplasia of the right cerebellar hemisphere, hypoplasia and dysplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere, an enlargement of the posterior fossa, and a smaller left cerebral peduncle.

Figure S2: Patient 2 at 3 years 11 months. Coronal T2-weighted magnetic resonance image showing almost complete absence of the right cerebellar hemisphere and the normal structure of the left cerebellar hemisphere as well as the normal size of the posterior fossa.

Figure S3: Patient 3 at 8 years 10 months. Axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance image showing severe hypoplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere, normal structure of the right cerebellar hemisphere, and an asymmetric posterior fossa with reduced volume ipsilateral to the cerebellar hypoplasia; there is a projection of a part of the occipital lobe on the left side (asterisks).

Figure S4: Patient 5 at the age of 9 days. (a) Axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) demonstrating severe hypoplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere, a hypoplastic vermis, the normal structure of the right cerebellar hemisphere, an asymmetric brainstem (volume reduced contralateral to the hypoplastic cerebellar hemisphere), and the normal volume of the posterior fossa. (b) Coronal T2-weighted MRI showing severe hypoplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere and the normal structure of the right cerebellar hemisphere.

Figure S5: Patient 7 at 1 year 4 months. (a) Axial T2-weighted magnetic resonance image (MRI) showing hypoplasia and dysplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere, the normal structure of the right cerebellar hemisphere, only the superior part of the cerebellar vermis, and an asymmetric posterior fossa with reduced volume ipsilateral to the cerebellar hypoplasia. (b) Coronal T2-weighted MRI demonstrating hypoplasia and dysplasia of the left cerebellar hemisphere and the normal structure of the right cerebellar hemisphere.

Table SI: Details of gestation and birth in seven children with severe unilateral cerebellar.

Table SII: Neuroimaging findings in seven patients with severe unilateral cerebellar hypoplasia.

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FilenameFormatSizeDescription
DMCN_3522_sm_Figure_S1.tif349KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Figure_S2.tif262KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Figure_S3.tif231KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Figure_S4.tif326KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Figure_S5.tif330KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Table_SI.doc38KSupporting info item
DMCN_3522_sm_Table_SII.doc41KSupporting info item

Please note: Wiley Blackwell is not responsible for the content or functionality of any supporting information supplied by the authors. Any queries (other than missing content) should be directed to the corresponding author for the article.