PERSONALITY AND RESPIRATORY RESPONSES TO SOUND AND LIGHT

Authors

  • Mary McCollum,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Baylor University College of Medicine, and Psychophysiology Division, Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences, Houston
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  • Neil R. Burch,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Baylor University College of Medicine, and Psychophysiology Division, Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences, Houston
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  • Robert Roessler

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry, Baylor University College of Medicine, and Psychophysiology Division, Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences, Houston
      Address requests for reprints to: Dr. Robert Roessler, Department of Psychiatry, Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77025.
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  • The assistance of Carol Briley, Harold Childers, Linda Clampit, Forrest Collins, R. G. Dossett, Jack Palmer, Rene Pingenot, Kussell Simpson, Kurt Solis, Roger Stevenson, Michael Taylor, and Harry Turley is gratefully acknowledged. We thank R. W. Frankmann for advice on the treatment of the amplitude data.

  • This research and the preparation of this report was supported in part by grants from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, AFOSR-727-031; the National Institute of Mental Health, MH 13630; the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NGR 44-003-031; and by an NIH medical student summer fellowship to the first author. The Common Research Computer Facility, Texas Medical Center, supported in part by a grant from the USPHS, FR 00254, was used for statistical analyses.

Address requests for reprints to: Dr. Robert Roessler, Department of Psychiatry, Baylor University College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77025.

ABSTRACT

Respiratory amplitude (RA) and respiratory rate (RR) parameters were examined in student subjects (Ss) following stimulation with five intensities of sound and five intensities of light. All Ss completed the MMPI and were then divided into high and low ego strength (Es) groups on the basis of their scores on the Barron scale. These groups were balanced for alertness-drowsiness by EEG criteria. High Es Ss responded with a greater increase in RA than low Es Ss and there was a strong trend for high Es Ss to respond less than low Es Ss in RR. Both RA and RR increased following stimulation with the greatest changes following greater intensities of stimulation in both modalities. Light induced a greater increase in RA and RR than sound.

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