Expectancy effects on omission evoked potentials in musicians and non-musicians

Authors

  • Marijtje L.A. Jongsma,

    1. Department of Biological Psychology, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Tom Eichele,

    1. Section for Cognitive Neurosciences, Institute for Biological and Medical Psychology, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway
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  • Rodrigo Quian Quiroga,

    1. Sloan-Swartz Center for Theoretical Neurobiology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA
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  • Kathleen M. Jenks,

    1. Music, Mind, Machine Group, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
    2. Behavioural Science Institute, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Peter Desain,

    1. Music, Mind, Machine Group, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Henkjan Honing,

    1. Music, Mind, Machine Group, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • Clementina M. Van Rijn

    1. Department of Biological Psychology, Nijmegen Institute of Cognition and Information, Radboud University Nijmegen, The Netherlands
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  • This project was supported by The Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research, (NWO VENI project nr. 451-02-026 “It's all in the rhythm” and NWO Pioneer project: “Music, Mind, Machine”). We hereby greatly acknowledge Helge Nordby for fruitful comments. We thank Gerard van Oijen and Paul Trilsbeek for technical support.

Address reprint requests to: Marijtje L.A. Jongsma, NICI, Radboud University of Nijmegen, P.O. Box 9104, 6500 HE Nijmegen, The Netherlands. E-mail: jongsma@nici.kun.nl

Abstract

An expanded omitted stimulus paradigm was investigated to determine whether expectancy would modulate the amplitude of the omission evoked potentials (OEPs). In addition, we examined the effects of musical expertise on OEPs. Trials started with 3–7 beats randomly and contained 5 omitted beats. Three types of trials (n=90) were presented with 1, 2, or 3 beats occurring between omissions. A tap response at the end of each trial was used to determine timing accuracy. Clear OEPs were observed over midline sites. We found main omission effects with respect to an N150 and a P400 OEPs component, such that peak amplitudes diminished whenever the occurrence of an omitted stimulus could be expected. In addition, an N600 OEPs component emerged in response to expectedly omitted stimuli toward the end of each trial within the group of musicians. Thus, musical training seems to lead to more efficient and more refined processing of auditory temporal patterns.

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