Distinct M50 and M100 auditory gating deficits in schizophrenia

Authors

  • Faith M. Hanlon,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery Institute Imaging Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    4. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Gregory A. Miller,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    3. Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    4. Beckman Institute Biomedical Imaging Center, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
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  • Robert J. Thoma,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery Institute Imaging Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Jessica Irwin,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Aaron Jones,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Sandra N. Moses,

    1. Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Radiology, University of California San Diego, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Mingxiong Huang,

    1. Rotman Research Institute, Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    2. VA Health Care System, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Michael P. Weisend,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery Institute Imaging Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. Department of Radiology, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Kim M. Paulson,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • J. Christopher Edgar,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    2. Beckman Institute Biomedical Imaging Center, University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
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  • Lawrence E. Adler,

    1. Department of Psychiatry, Denver VA Medical Center, Denver, Colorado, USA
    2. University of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, Colorado, USA
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  • Jose M. Cañive

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico Health Sciences Center, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. Department of Psychiatry, New Mexico VA Health Care System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • This research was supported by grants from the Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery (MIND) Institute and NIMH (R01 MH65304) to Jose M. Cañive and from the National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression (NARSAD) to Robert J. Thoma. The authors thank Robin Douglas, Fernando Torres, Kimberly Martin, Lawrence Calais, Jeanne Schneider, and Juan Bustillo for their recruitment efforts and Lawrence Hubert and Steven Gangestad for statistical consultation.

Address reprint requests to: Jose M. Cañive, The New Mexico VA Health Care System, VAMC/116A, 1501 San Pedro SE, Albuquerque, NM 87108. E-mail: Jose.Canive@med.va.gov.

Abstract

The time course of the schizophrenia auditory gating deficit may provide clues to mechanisms of impaired cognition. Magnetoencephalography was recorded during a standard paired-click paradigm. Using source strength of the M50 and M100 components for each click, calculated from dipole locations identified as underlying each component for the first click, a ratio of the second divided by the first was used to measure gating. Patients showed a left-hemisphere gating deficit in M50 and a bilateral gating deficit in M100. Hypothesizing that an early deficit may affect later processing, hierarchical regression was used to examine variance shared between the components. A left-hemisphere M100 gating deficit was coupled with the left M50 gating deficit. In contrast, a right-hemisphere M100 gating deficit was unrelated to M50 gating in either hemisphere. Investigations of interhemisphere gating relations may clarify group differences in regional connectivity and their role in gating.

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