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N1 and the mismatch negativity are spatiotemporally distinct ERP components: Disruption of immediate memory by auditory distraction can be related to N1

Authors

  • Tom Campbell,

    1. Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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  • István Winkler,

    1. Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    3. Institute of Psychology, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary
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  • Teija Kujala

    1. Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    2. Cognitive Brain Research Unit, Department of Psychology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
    3. Helsinki Brain Research Centre, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland
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Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: ERRATUM Volume 45, Issue 1, 171, Article first published online: 6 December 2007

  • This work was, in part, supported by a Marie Curie Fellowship of the European Community programme “Improving the Human Research Potential and the Socio-Economic Knowledge Base” under contract number HPMF-CT-2000-00902, the University of Helsinki, the Academy of Finland (200522), and by the Hungarian National Research Fund (OTKA T048383).

Address reprint requests to: Tom Campbell, Helsinki Collegium for Advanced Studies, P.O. Box 4, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki, Finland. E-mail: tom.campbell@helsinki.fi

Abstract

Event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded for ignored tones presented during the retention interval of a delayed serial recall task. The mismatch negativity (MMN) and N1 ERP components were measured to discern spatiotemporal and functional properties of their generation. A nine-token sequence with nine different tone pitches was more disruptive than an oddball (two-token) sequence, yet this oddball sequence was no more disruptive than a single repeating tone (one-token). Tones of the nine-token sequence elicited augmented N1 amplitudes compared to identical tones delivered in the one-token sequence, yet deviants elicited an additional component (MMN) with distinct temporal properties and topography. These results suggested that MMN and N1 are separate, functionally distinct components. Implications are discussed for the N1 hypothesis and the changing-state hypothesis of the disruption of serial recall performance by auditory distraction.

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