Superior temporal gyrus spectral abnormalities in schizophrenia

Authors

  • J. Christopher Edgar,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    2. Beckman Institute Biomedical Imaging Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    3. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    4. Department of Radiology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA
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  • Faith M. Hanlon,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. The MIND Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Ming-Xiong Huang,

    1. Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, California, USA
    2. VA San Diego Healthcare System, San Diego, California, USA
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  • Michael P. Weisend,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. The MIND Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. Department of Radiology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Robert J. Thoma,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    3. The MIND Institute, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Bruce Carpenter,

    1. Department of Mathematics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
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  • Karsten Hoechstetter,

    1. MEGIS Software GmbH, Gräfelfing, Germany
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  • José M. Cañive,

    1. Center for Functional Brain Imaging, New Mexico VA Healthcare System, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    2. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
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  • Gregory A. Miller

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    2. Beckman Institute Biomedical Imaging Center, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
    3. Department of Psychiatry, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico, USA
    4. Department of Psychiatry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, USA
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  • J. Christopher Edgar is now at the Department of Radiology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA, USA. Ming-Xiong Huang is now at the Department of Radiology, University of California, San Diego, CA, USA, and at the VA San Diego Healthcare System.
    This research was supported by a National Alliance for Research on Schizophrenia and Depression Young Investigator Award and grants from the National Institute of Mental Health (R01 MH61358, R01 MH65304, T32 MH19554), the National Institute of Drug Abuse (R21 DA1411), the Biomedical Research Institute of New Mexico, the University of Illinois Beckman Institute and Intercampus Research Initiative in Biotechnology, and the Mental Illness and Neuroscience Discovery Institute.
    The authors thank Fernando Torres, Robin Douglas, and Jeanne Schneider for help with this project. The authors also thank Dr. Patrick Berg for analysis advice.

Address reprint requests to: J. Christopher Edgar, Department of Radiology, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology – Division of Research, 34th Street and Civic Center Boulevard, 2nd Floor, Room 2115, Philadelphia, Pa, 19104, USA. E-mail: edgarj@email.chop.edu.

Abstract

Considerable evidence indicates early auditory stimulus processing abnormalities in schizophrenia, but the mechanisms are unclear. The present study examined oscillatory phenomena during a paired-click paradigm in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) as a possible core problem. The primary question addressed is whether first click and/or second click group differences in the time-domain evoked response in patients with schizophrenia are due to (1) group differences in the magnitude of poststimulus oscillatory activity, (2) group differences in poststimulus phase-locking, and/or (3) group differences in the magnitude of ongoing background oscillatory activity. Dense-array magnetoencephalography from 45 controls and 45 patients with schizophrenia produced left- and right-hemisphere STG 50- and 100-ms time-frequency evoked, phase-locking, and total power measures. Whereas first click 100-ms evoked theta and alpha abnormalities were observed bilaterally, evoked low beta-band differences were specific to the left hemisphere. Compared to controls, patients with schizophrenia showed more low-frequency phase variability, and the decreased 100-ms S1 evoked response observed in patients was best predicted by the STG phase-locking measure.

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