Get access

Protective effect of interval exercise on psychophysiological stress reactivity in children

Authors

  • James N. Roemmich,

    1. Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, New York, USA
    2. Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Maya Lambiase,

    1. Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, New York, USA
    2. Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah J. Salvy,

    1. Division of Behavioral Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, University at Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Buffalo, New York, USA
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Peter J. Horvath

    1. Department of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, School of Public Health and Health Professions, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, New York, USA
    Search for more papers by this author

  • The authors thank Durval Morgan and Sylvia Robinson for their assistance with data collection. Maya Lambiase coordinated and completed the data collection of Experiment 2 as partial fulfillment of the requirements for a Master's of Science degree under the mentorship of Dr. Roemmich. This work was supported, in part, by the University at Buffalo Mark Diamond Research Fund for Graduate Research.

Address reprint requests to: James N. Roemmich, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Behavioral Medicine, State University of New York at Buffalo, Farber Hall, Room G56, 3435 Main Street, Building #26, Buffalo, NY 14214-3000, USA. E-mail: roemmich@buffalo.edu

Abstract

Two studies determined whether interval exercise reduces children's stress reactivity. For Experiment 1 children completed interval exercise (n=14) or watched TV (n=14) for 25 min. After 20 min rest children completed a speech task. Speech-induced diastolic blood pressure (DBP) reactivity was dampened in the exercise group (p<.05). For Experiment 2 children (n=22) completed interval exercise-speech and TV-speech conditions on separate days. Physical activity was assessed by accelerometry and aerobic fitness estimated by submaximal exercise. DBP, systolic BP, and heart rate (HR) reactivity to the speech stressor were dampened (p<.05) after exercise compared to TV watching. Fitness was positively associated with HR reactivity. Interval exercise that mimics usual patterns of physically active play dampens cardiovascular reactivity to interpersonal stress.

Ancillary