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The impact of emotion on respiratory-related evoked potentials

Authors

  • Andreas Von Leupoldt,

    1. Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
    2. Department of Psychology, University of Hamburg, Hamburg, Germany
    3. Department of Systems Neuroscience, University Medical Center, Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany
    4. NIMH Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Andrea Vovk,

    1. Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Margaret M. Bradley,

    1. NIMH Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Andreas Keil,

    1. NIMH Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Peter J. Lang,

    1. NIMH Center for the Study of Emotion and Attention, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • Paul W. Davenport

    1. Department of Physiological Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, USA
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  • The authors wish to thank Bethany Wangelin, Marie Karlsson, Vincent Costa, Joshua R. Shumen, Mark Hotchkiss, Nicole Wedell, Katja Wedell, and A. Daniel Martin for assistance and support. This study was supported in part by a grant from the National Institute of Mental Health (P50 MH 72850) to Peter J. Lang, and by a stipend (Heisenberg-Stipendium, DFG LE 1843/9-1) from the German Research Society (Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, DFG) to Andreas von Leupoldt.

Address reprint requests to: Dr. Andreas von Leupoldt, Department of Psychology, University of Hamburg, Von-Melle-Park 5, 20146 Hamburg, Germany. E-mail: andreas.vonleupoldt@uni-hamburg.de

Abstract

Emotion influences the perception of respiratory sensations, although the specific mechanism underlying this modulation is not yet clear. We examined the impact of viewing pleasant, neutral, and unpleasant affective pictures on the respiratory-related evoked potential (RREP) elicited by a short inspiratory occlusion in healthy volunteers. Reduced P3 amplitude of the RREP was found for respiratory probes presented when viewing pleasant or unpleasant series, when compared to those presented during the neutral series. Earlier RREP components, such as Nf, P1, N1, and P2, showed no modulation by emotion. The results suggest that emotion impacts the perception of respiratory sensations by reducing the attentional resources available for processing afferent respiratory sensory signals.

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