Explaining the Diversity of Southeast Asian Shrimp Aquaculture

Authors

  • DEREK HALL

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    1. 1International Development Studies Programme, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, Canada, K9J 7B8.
      Derek Hall, International Development Studies Programme, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, Canada, K9J 7B8. e-mail: dhall@trentu.ca
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  • Earlier versions of this paper were presented at the 2001 Annual Meeting of the Rural Sociological Society, Albuquerque, New Mexico, 18 August 2001 and at the workshop ‘Asian Political Economy in an Age of Globalization’, Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College, 10–11 May 2002. For their comments, I am grateful to participants in those meetings, and to Keith Barney, Jennifer Clapp, Bob Hansen, Eric Helleiner, Peter Katzenstein, Philip McMichael, Mike Phillips, Mike Skladany, Megan Thomas and Peter Vandergeest.

Derek Hall, International Development Studies Programme, Trent University, 1600 West Bank Drive, Peterborough, ON, Canada, K9J 7B8. e-mail: dhall@trentu.ca

Abstract

Despite the large amount of academic attention that Southeast Asian shrimp farming has received since the 1980s, few attempts have been made to explain the remarkable variation in the industry's organization across countries and localities. This paper compares the development of shrimp farming in Indonesia, the Philippines and Thailand, arguing that differences can be traced to variations in the initial conditions under which shrimp farming was established, the different ways that national aquacultures are embedded in the regional political economy and the ways in which different countries have responded to the characteristic environmental problems the sector causes itself.

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