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Circulating levels of placental protein 14 in ectopic pregnancy

Authors

  • I. Stabile,

    Senior Research Fellow
    1. Joint Academic Unit of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Physiology, The Royal London Hospital and St. Bartholomew's Hospitals, London
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  • F. Olajide,

    Clinical Research Fellow
    1. Joint Academic Unit of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Physiology, The Royal London Hospital and St. Bartholomew's Hospitals, London
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  • T. Chard,

    Professor
    1. Joint Academic Unit of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Physiology, The Royal London Hospital and St. Bartholomew's Hospitals, London
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  • J. G. Grudzinskas

    Professor, Corresponding author
    1. Joint Academic Unit of Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Reproductive Physiology, The Royal London Hospital and St. Bartholomew's Hospitals, London
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Correspondence: Professor J. G. Grudzinskas, Academic Unit of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, The Royal London Hospital, Whitechapel, London E1 1BB, UK.

ABSTRACT

Objective To determine circulating levels of placental protein 14 (PP14) in complications of early pregnancy.

Design Biochemical monitoring of women presenting with vaginal bleeding and/or abdominal pain.

Setting An emergency gynaecological ultrasound clinic in a London teaching hospital.

Subjects Venous blood samples were obtained from 67 women with normal pregnancy (n= 9), ectopic pregnancy (n= 26) and failed intrauterine pregnancy (n= 32). This group included anembryonic pregnancy (n= 18), missed miscarriage (n= 2), spontaneous miscarriage of a previously demonstrated live fetus (n= 6), incomplete miscarriage (n= 4), complete miscarriage (n= 1) and molar pregnancy (n= 1).

Main outcome measures Serum PP14 levels in the group of women with a failed intrauterine pregnancy in relation to the normal range for PP14.

Results Eighty-one percent of women who miscarried spontaneously had normal serum PP14 levels; 81% of women with ectopic pregnancy had depressed (< 5th centile) serum PP14 levels.

Conclusion Measurements of PP14 may be useful in distinguishing spontaneous miscarriage from ectopic pregnancy, but not in the management of threatened miscarriage.

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