The effects of 3g eicosapentaenoic acid daily on recurrence of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy induced hypertension

Authors

  • M. T. E. W. Bulstra-Ramakers,

    Consultant
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Groningen, The Netherlands
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  • H. J. Huisjes,

    Professor , Corresponding author
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Groningen, The Netherlands
      Correspondence: Professor H. J. Huisjes, Medical Faculty, Bloemsingel 10, 9712 KZ Groningen, The Netherlands.
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  • G. H. A. Visser

    Professor
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University Hospital, Groningen, The Netherlands
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Correspondence: Professor H. J. Huisjes, Medical Faculty, Bloemsingel 10, 9712 KZ Groningen, The Netherlands.

ABSTRACT

Objective To study the effects of addition of 3 g eicosapentaenoic acid daily to the diet, on recurrence rate of intrauterine growth retardation and pregnancy induced hypertension in a high risk population.

Design Prospective, double blind, randomised multicentre study. Eicosapentaenoic acid or placebo were given from 12 to 14 weeks of gestation onwards.

Setting University Hospital and regional hospitals in the north of the Netherlands.

Subjects Sixty-three women with a history of intrauterine growth retardation (birthweight < 10th centile) with or without pregnancy induced hypertension in the previous pregnancy.

Main outcome measures Birthweight centiles and signs of pregnancy induced hypertension in current pregnancy.

Results One-third of the women developed pregnancy induced hypertension and one-third of the infants had a birthweight below the 10th centile. There were no differences between eicosapentaenoic acid and placebo group.

Conclusion Addition of 3 g eicosapentaenoic acid daily does not prevent recurrence of intrauterine growth retardation or pregnancy induced hypertension in a high risk population.

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