Third-trimester fetal MRI in isolated 10- to 12-mm ventriculomegaly: is it worth it?

Authors

  • LJ Salomon,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • a J Ouahba,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • b A-L Delezoide,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • c E Vuillard,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • b J-F Oury,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • b G Sebag,

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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  • and a C Garel a

    1. a Department of Pediatric Imaging,b Department of Obstetrics and c Department of Developmental Biology, Hopital Robert Debré, AP-HP, Paris, France
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Dr C Garel, Service d’imagerie pédiatrique, Hôpital Robert Debré, 48, boulevard Sérurier 75019 Paris, France. Email catherine.garel@rdb.aphp.fr

Abstract

Objective  The justification for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in isolated mild ventriculomegaly remains controversial. This study was undertaken to evaluate the contribution of third-trimester MRI in isolated 10- to 12-mm fetal ventriculomegaly.

Design  Observational prospective cohort study.

Setting  Universitary prenatal reference centre.

Population  From February 2000 to May 2005, we prospectively collected data concerning fetuses referred to us for cerebral MRI following detection of ventriculomegaly by ultrasound scan (n= 310).

Methods  Among these, we identified and analysed those cases in which ventriculomegaly was isolated and did not exceed 12 mm in ultrasound examinations prior to MRI scan (n= 185).

Main outcome measure  Cases in which MRI provided additional information that was likely to have an impact on prenatal management were detailed.

Results  During the study period, 310 MRI were performed because of fetal ventriculomegaly. Hundred and eighty-five were suspected to be isolated 10- to 12-mm ventriculomegalies in ultrasound scan and formed our database. MRI confirmed the 10- to 12-mm isolated fetal ventriculomegaly in 106 cases (57.3%) and found other abnormalities in 5 (4.7%) of these 106 cases. MRI found ventricular measurement to be less than 10 mm in 43 cases (23.3%) and more than 12 mm in 36 cases (19.4%). Among these 36 fetuses with ventricle size more than 12 mm, 6 (16.7%) had other abnormalities, whereas MRI did not find other abnormalities in the 43 cases with ventricle size below 10 mm.

Conclusion  Before advantages of MRI to ultrasound examination can be demonstrated, it seems reasonable that MRI should remain an investigational tool, restricted to selected clinical situations in which the results are expected to modify case management. Where ultrasound scan suspects isolated ventriculomegaly of 10 to 12 mm, our data suggest that when the finding is confirmed with MRI this could be expected in around 5% of cases. Therefore, the policy of routine MRI in such cases should depend on prenatal centres’ priorities.

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