Polycystic ovary syndrome and pregnancy outcome: red herring or red flag?

Authors

  • D Siassakos,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fertility clinic, Cotswold Centre, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK
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  • P Wardle

    1. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fertility clinic, Cotswold Centre, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, UK
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Dr D Siassakos, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fertility clinic, Cotswold Centre, Southmead Hospital, North Bristol NHS Trust, Bristol, BS10 5NB, UK Email jsiasakos@hotmail.com, jsiasakos@btopenworld.com

Abstract

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most common endocrine disorders in women, associated with a characteristic ovarian appearance at ultrasound scan, hyperandrogenism, and ovulatory disorders. The pathogenesis appears to be mainly related to reduced insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues, leading to hyperinsulinaemia. There is a wide variation in the severity of PCOS symptoms. Women with PCOS are believed to be predisposed to a variety of complications in pregnancy. We present a summary of the evidence surrounding these claims and discuss the weaknesses of the available to date studies.

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