Adolescents’ beliefs about their parents’ human papillomavirus vaccination decisions

Authors


Dr J Waller, Cancer Research UK Health Behaviour Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT, UK. Email j.waller@ucl.ac.uk

Abstract

Please cite this paper as: Forster A, Marlow L, Waller J. Adolescents’ beliefs about their parents’ human papillomavirus vaccination decisions. BJOG 2010;117:229–233.

A significant minority of parents are concerned that human papillomavirus vaccination will affect sexual behaviour. We explored this issue with 162 adolescent girls. Most (between 90 and 92%) did not perceive a connection between parental consent to vaccination and parental authorisation for sexual activity, but a small percentage believed that vaccination consent implied that they were old enough to have sex (8%), or that it was okay for them to be sexually active (10%). The findings are broadly reassuring, but highlight the need for vaccination information materials to clarify why the vaccine is administered before sexual debut.

Ancillary