A novel cause for abnormal liver function tests in pregnancy and the puerperium: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Authors


Dr LM Page, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, West Middlesex University Hospital, Twickenham Road, Isleworth, Middlesex, TW7 6AF, UK. Email louise.page@wmuh.nhs.uk

Abstract

Please cite this paper as: Page L, Girling J. A novel cause for abnormal liver function tests in pregnancy and the puerperium: non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. BJOG 2011;118:1532–1535.

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the commonest liver disease in the western world, but has never been reported in pregnancy before. We suggest that NAFLD should also be considered as a cause for abnormal liver function tests during pregnancy. As NAFLD is driven by insulin resistance, it is biologically plausible that pregnancy may reveal previously subclinical disease. Obstetricians have a vital role in optimising maternal health during and after pregnancy and therefore we need to include NAFLD in the differential diagnosis for abnormal liver function tests and recommend lifestyle modifications that may prevent progression to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma.

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