EFFECT OF ION REMOVAL ON THE SOLUBILITY OF RAT BRAIN PROTEINS IN CHLOROFORM-METHANOL MIXTURES*

Authors

  • Marjorie B. Lees†

    1. Dept. of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Dartmouth Medical School, Hanover, N.H.; Research Laboratory, McLean Hospital, Belmont, Mass.; and Dept. of Biological Chemistry, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass.
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  • Acknowledgements—The expert technical assistance of Sally Paxman, Cretyl Mills and Dorothy Farrar in various phases of this work is gratefully acknowledged.

  • *

    McLean Hospital Research Laboratory, Belmont, Mass. U.S.A.

Abstract

—The amount of chloroform-methanol-soluble protein obtained from rat brain tissue homogenates which have been subjected to washing by repeated contrifugation or dialysis is a several-fold greater than that obtained from untreated homogenates. The increase consequence of the removal of loosely bound electrolytes during the process of centrifugation or dialysis: little or no increase is observed upon (a) the addition of the supernatant, the ashed supernatant, or the diffusate to the washed homogenate; (b) the addition of inorganic salts to the washed homogenate; or (c) washing of the homogenate with a salt solution.

The previously observed effect of sucrose in increasing the amount of chloroform–methanol-soluble protein obtained from subcellular fractions is apparently superimposed upon the effect of the removal of salts.

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