Synaptic Proteins After Electroconvulsive Seizures in Immature Rats

Authors

  • Ole Steen Jørgensen,

    Corresponding author
    1. Psychochemistry Institute, Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark; and tVeterans Administration Medical Center, Epilepsy Research Laboratory, Sepulveda, California 91343
      Address reprint requests and correspondence to Ole Steen Jorgensen,
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  • Barney Dwyer,

    1. The Department of Neurology and the Brain Research Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024, U.S.A
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  • Claude G. Wasterlain

    1. The Department of Neurology and the Brain Research Institute, UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024, U.S.A
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Address reprint requests and correspondence to Ole Steen Jorgensen,

Abstract:

The forebrain content of several rat brain synaptic proteins (synaptin, D1, D2, and D3) was reduced in rats receiving electroconvulsive seizures on days 2–11, 9–18, or 19–28 and sacrificed at the age of 30 days. Forebrain weight, total protein, and the glial enzyme glutamine synthetase were also decreased, whereas the neuronal enolase 14–3–2 was unchanged. The findings suggest that seizures in the immature rat brain resulted in a parallel reduction of synaptic material and of the amount of glial cells. The increased concentration of the enolase 14–3–2 found in rats seizured on days 19–28 may reflect the high demands on the glycolytic system during the seizures.

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