Effect of High Doses of Dietary Vitamin E on the Concentrations of Vitamin E in Several Brain Regions, Plasma, Liver, and Adipose Tissue of Rats

Authors

  • G. T. Vatassery,

    Corresponding author
    1. Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center and Neurology and Research Services, Veterans Administration Medical Center; Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota;
      Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. G. T. Vatassery at GRECC Program, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55417, U.S.A.
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  • M. F. Brin,

    1. Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University;
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  • S. Fahn,

    1. Department of Neurology, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University;
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  • H. J. Kayden,

    1. Department of Medicine, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York, U.S.A.
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  • M. G. Traber

    1. Department of Medicine, New York University Medical Center, New York, New York, U.S.A.
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr. G. T. Vatassery at GRECC Program, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Minneapolis, MN 55417, U.S.A.

Abstract

Abstract: The object of this study was to assess the influence of high levels of dietary vitamin E on vitamin E concentrations in specific areas of the brain. Four-week-old male rats were fed vitamin E-deficient, control, and high-vitamin E (1,000 IU/kg) diets for 4 months. Concentrations of α-tocopherol in serum, adipose tissue, liver, cerebrum, cerebellum, and striatum were determined by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. In the high-vitamin E group, α-tocopherol concentrations in cerebrum, cerebellum, and striatum increased uniformly to 1.4-fold of values in controls; serum, adipose tissue, and liver attained even higher concentrations: 2.2-, 2.2-, and 4.6-fold, respectively, of control values. As observed before, brain levels of α-tocopherol were somewhat resistant to vitamin E deficiency, in contrast to the peripheral tissues.

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