Zebrafish as a new animal model for movement disorders

Authors

  • Laura Flinn,

    1. MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
    2. Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, Medical School, Sheffield, UK
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  • Sandrine Bretaud,

    1. Institute de Biologie et Chimié des Proteines, Université Claude Bernard, Lyon, France
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  • Christine Lo,

    1. MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
    2. Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, Medical School, Sheffield, UK
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  • Phillip W. Ingham,

    1. MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
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  • Oliver Bandmann

    1. MRC Centre for Developmental and Biomedical Genetics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK
    2. Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, Medical School, Sheffield, UK
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Address correspondence and reprint requests to Dr Oliver Bandmann MD PhD, Academic Neurology Unit, University of Sheffield, E Floor Medical School, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield S10 2RX, UK. E-mail: o.bandmann@sheffield.ac.uk

Abstract

The zebrafish, long recognized as a model organism for the analysis of basic developmental processes, is now also emerging as an alternative animal model for human diseases. This review will first provide an overview of the particular characteristics of zebrafish in general and their dopaminergic nervous system in particular. We will then summarize all work undertaken so far to establish zebrafish as a new animal model for movement disorders and will finally emphasize its particular strength – amenability to high throughput in vivo drug screening.

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