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Keywords:

  • human blood–brain barrier;
  • liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry;
  • quantitative targeted absolute proteomics;
  • receptors;
  • species difference;
  • transporters

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

J. Neurochem. (2011) 117, 333–345.

Abstract

We have obtained, for the first time, a quantitative protein expression profile of membrane transporters and receptors in human brain microvessels, that is, the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Brain microvessels were isolated from brain cortexes of seven males (16–77 years old) and protein expression of 114 membrane proteins was determined by means of a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometric quantification method using recently established in-silico peptide selection criteria. Among drug transporters, breast cancer resistance protein showed the most abundant protein expression (8.14 fmol/μg protein), and its expression level was 1.85-fold greater in humans than in mice. By contrast, the expression level of P-glycoprotein in humans (6.06 fmol/μg protein) was 2.33-fold smaller than that of mdr1a in mice. The organic anion transporters reported in rodent BBB, that is, multidrug resistance-associated protein, organic anion transporter and organic anion-transporting polypeptide family members, were under limit of quantification in humans, except multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (0.195 fmol/μg protein). Among detected transporters and receptors for endogenous substances, the glucose transporter 1 level was similar to that of mouse, while the L-type amino acid transporter 1 level was fivefold smaller than that of mouse. These findings should be useful for understanding human BBB function and its differences from that in mouse.

Abbreviations used
ABC

ATP-binding cassette

BBB

blood–brain barrier

BCRP

breast cancer resistance protein

CYP

cytochrome P450

4F2hc

4F2 heavy chain

EAAT

excitatory amino acid transporter

GLUT

glucose transporter

LC-MS/MS

liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry

MDR

multidrug resistance

MRP

multidrug resistance-associated protein

MRM

multiple reaction monitoring

OAT

organic anion transporter

OATP

organic anion-transporting polypeptide

PET

positron emission tomography

SPECT

single photon emission computed tomography

SLC

solute carrier

Blood-brain barrier (BBB) research has made enormous progress during the past two decades. Identification of tight junction proteins as a static barrier and the subsequent identification of P-glycoprotein (P-gp/MDR1/mdr1a), followed by various transporters and receptors, as a functional barrier provided evidence that the BBB has dual physiological functions in terms of brain homeostasis (Ohtsuki and Terasaki 2007), i.e., a barrier function of excluding circulating drugs and toxic agents from entering the CNS and a carrier function of supplying essential nutrients, hormones and drugs to the brain and eliminating metabolites from the brain. However, most of these findings were based on rodent data, and the functions and molecular mechanisms of the human BBB are still poorly understood. Indeed, mdr1a has been known to be expressed in rodent BBB and to function as the efflux pump to prevent entry of xenobiotics into the brain for two decades, but the question of whether or not MDR1 works at the human BBB was only resolved recently (Sasongko et al. 2005). From the viewpoints of clinical pharmacology and therapeutics, it is important to quantitatively elucidate the molecular basis of the transport functions at the human BBB to understand the brain distribution of drugs and endogenous compounds in humans, and to identify species differences.

Recent studies using imaging technologies have shown that human brain penetration of [18F]altanserin and [11C]GR205171, substrates of MDR1, was 4.5- and 8.6-fold greater than in rodents, respectively (Syvanen et al. 2009). Thus, MDR1 function at the human BBB might be less than that in rodents. However, this remains uncertain, because other several substrates did not show any species difference in brain penetration (Friden et al. 2009). Amino acid availability and tryptophan transport into the brain have been reported to affect cerebral protein and serotonin synthesis, respectively, in the brain (Fernstrom and Wurtman 1972; Lajtha 1974; Pratt 1976; Pardridge and Oldendorf 1977). The protein synthesis rate and serotonin concentration in human brain have been reported to be several-fold smaller than those in rodent brain (Hawkins et al. 1989; Young et al. 1994; Irifune et al. 1997), which might imply decreased influx rates of amino acids through the human BBB. System L, corresponding to L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1) and 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc), is involved in amino acid influx transport and also mediates brain uptake of drugs such as levodopa and melphalan (Ohtsuki and Terasaki 2007). Therefore, interspecies differences in BBB permeability of drugs via system L would be expected to result in species differences of drug efficacy.

Imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are the only functional analytical methods able to quantitatively evaluate BBB permeability of compounds in humans. However, availability of suitable ligands is still limited to only a few transporters (Kusuhara and Sugiyama 2009), and it is difficult to evaluate accurately the activities of individual transporters, because substrate and inhibitor specificities overlap among transporters, such as MDR1 and breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), or multidrug resistance-associated protein 4 (MRP4) and organic anion transporter 3 (OAT3) (Kusuhara et al. 1999; Uchida et al. 2007; Enokizono et al. 2008; Ose et al. 2009). Comprehensive quantification of mRNA expression has been examined, but mRNA expression levels are not necessarily correlated to transporter function (Lescale-Matys et al. 1993; Molina-Arcas et al. 2005).

To overcome these problems, we developed a liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based absolute quantification method using in-silico peptide selection criteria, and employed it to determine the protein expression levels of 34 transporters in mouse brain microvessels (Kamiie et al. 2008). In this method, the protein expression of a target molecule is selectively quantified by using a specific peptide probe. The in-silico selection criteria make it possible to select an appropriate peptide probe specific for each target molecule, thereby affording highly sensitive and accurate quantification. The protein levels have been shown to correlate to the activities of various functional membrane proteins, such as Na+/glucose co-transporter 1, cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) and β secretase (Dyer et al. 1997; Fukumoto et al. 2002; Langenfeld et al. 2009). Therefore, clarifying protein expression of transporters or receptors in human brain microvessels by means of this technique is a rational strategy to understand the physiological roles of transport systems present at the human BBB.

The purpose of the present study was to determine comprehensively the protein expression levels of transporters and receptors in human brain microvessels, to clarify the role of the human BBB in drug distribution and homeostasis in the brain. We examined protein expression levels of 114 molecules, including ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and solute carrier (SLC) transporters and receptors, and compared the results with the mouse data to elucidate species differences in the BBB transport systems.

Materials and methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

Materials

Frozen brain cortexes of six Caucasians were purchased from Analytical Biological Services (Wilmington, DE, USA). Frozen brain cortex of a Japanese subject was kindly provided by Prof. Takashi Suzuki of Tohoku University Hospital. The research protocols for the present study were approved by the Ethics Committees of Tohoku University School of Medicine and the Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tohoku University. All peptides were chosen by employing the in-silico selection criteria described previously (Kamiie et al. 2008), and synthesized by Thermoelectron Corporation (Sedanstrabe, Germany) with > 95% peptide purity. The concentrations of peptide solutions were determined by quantitative amino acid analysis (Lachrom Elite, Hitachi, Tokyo, Japan). Other chemicals were commercial products of analytical grade.

Isolation of human brain microvessels by the nylon mesh method for donor numbers 1 to 6

Brain microvessels were isolated as described previously (Dauchy et al. 2008) with minor modifications. All procedures were carried out at 4°C on 1.0–3.2 g samples of cortex. Brain cortex was dissected into 1-mm pieces, which were homogenized with a Potter–Elvehjem homogenizer using 20 up-and-down unrotated strokes by hand in 5 volumes of solution B (101 mM NaCl, 4.6 mM KCl, 2.5 mM CaCl2, 1.2 mM KH2PO4, 1.2 mM MgSO4, 15 mM HEPES, pH 7.4) per brain weight. The homogenate was centrifuged at 1000 g for 10 min, the pellet was suspended in solution B containing 17.5% dextran, and the suspension was centrifuged for 15 min at 4500 g. The resulting pellet was suspended in solution A (solution B containing 25 mM NaHCO3, 10 mM glucose, 1 mM pyruvate and 5 g/L bovine serum albumin), passed through a 45 μm nylon mesh, and then washed with 30 mL of solution A. The microvessels retained on the nylon mesh were immediately collected using solution A, centrifuged at 1000 g for 5 min, and then suspended in solution B. The microvessels were again centrifuged at 1000 g for 5 min, suspended in hypotonic buffer (10 mM Tris–HCl, 10 mM NaCl, 1.5 mM MgCl2, pH 7.4) and sonicated. The microvessels were stored at −80°C after measurement of the protein concentration by the Lowry method using the DC protein assay reagent (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA, USA). The recovered amounts of microvessels were 244 ± 38 μg protein/g brain [mean ± SEM (= 6)].

Isolation of human brain microvessels by the glass bead column method for donor number 7

Brain microvessels were isolated as described previously (Pardridge et al. 1987) with minor modifications. All procedures were carried out at 4°C, using 10.5 g of cortex. Brain cortex was dissected into 1-mm pieces, which were homogenized with a Potter–Elvehjem homogenizer using 13 up-and-down unrotated strokes by hand in 5 volumes of solution A per brain weight. Dextran was added to the homogenate to a final concentration of 13%, and the mixture was centrifuged at 5800 g for 10 min. The pellet was suspended in solution A and passed through a 210 μm nylon mesh. The filtrate was passed over a column containing 350–500 μm glass beads, and washed with 40 mL of solution A. The microvessels adhering to the beads were detached into solution A by gentle agitation, and, as soon as the beads precipitated, the supernatant including the microvessels was collected. The supernatant was centrifuged at 500 g for 5 min. The pellet was suspended in solution B, and centrifuged at 1000 g for 5 min. The resulting pellet was suspended in solution B, and centrifuged at 1000 g for 5 min. This pellet was suspended in solution B containing medium 199, layered on top of a pre-established 45% Percoll gradient, and then centrifuged at 1000 g for 10 min. The middle layer was collected in solution B and centrifuged at 1000 g for 5 min. The pellet containing microvessels was suspended in solution B and stored at −80°C after measurement of the protein concentration. The recovered amounts of microvessels were 248 μg protein/g brain.

Animals

Male ddy mice were purchased from Charles River (Yokohama, Japan). Mice were maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle in a temperature-controlled environment with free access to food and water. The mice were used at 10 weeks of age for the experiments. The protocol was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee at Tohoku University (Permission No.21-Pharm-Animal-4).

Isolation of mouse brain microvessels

Mouse brain microvessels were isolated as described previously (Ohtsuki et al. 2007) with minor modification, and used to determine the protein expression amounts of abca1, abca2, abca8a, abca8b, abca9, cd147, ent1, glut3, insr, lrp1 and tfr1. All procedures were carried out at 4°C except for perfusion. Male ddy mice (10 weeks of age) were transcardially perfused with phosphate-buffered saline to remove blood under anesthesia induced with pentobarbital, and then the cerebrum was isolated. Ten cerebrums were dissected into 1-mm pieces, and homogenized with a Potter–Elvehjem homogenizer using 10 up-and-down no-rotated strokes by hand in fourfold volume solution B of brain weight. After the dextrane was added to the homogenate as the final concentration of 16%, the mixture was centrifuged at 4500 g for 10 min. The pellet was suspended in solution A and passed through a 85 μm nylon mesh, and the filtrate was passed over a column containing 350–500 μm glass beads, and then washed with 50 mL solution A. The microvessels adhering to the beads were detached to solution A by gentle agitation, and, as soon as the beads go down, the supernatant including the microvessels were collected. The supernatant was centrifuged at 230 g for 5 min. The pellet was suspended with solution B, and centrifuged at 1700 g for 5 min. Again, the pellet was suspended with solution B, and centrifuged at 1700 g for 5 min. The pellet was suspended with hypotonic buffer and sonicated. The microvessels were stored at −80°C after measurement of the protein concentration. The recovered amounts of microvessels were 74.7 ± 4.7 μg protein/g brain [mean ± SEM (= 10)].

Multiplexed MRM analysis

Protein expression amounts of the target molecules were simultaneously determined by means of multiplexed multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) analysis as described previously (Kamiie et al. 2008). Whole tissue lysates of isolated brain microvessels (50 μg protein) were solubilized in 500 mM Tris–HCl (pH 8.5), 7 M guanidine hydrochloride, 10 mM EDTA, and the proteins were S-carbamoylmethylated as described (Kamiie et al. 2008). The alkylated proteins were precipitated with a mixture of methanol and chloroform. The precipitates were dissolved in 6 M urea in 100 mM Tris–HCl (pH 8.5), diluted fivefold with 100 mM Tris–HCl (pH 8.5) and treated with tosylphenylalanyl chloromethyl ketone-treated trypsin (Promega, Madison, WI, USA) at an enzyme/substrate ratio of 1 : 100 at 37°C for 16 h. The tryptic digests were mixed with internal standard peptides and formic acid, and then centrifuged at 4°C and 17 360 g for 5 min for HPLC-MS/MS analysis or for 15 min for nanoLC-MS/MS analysis. The supernatants were subjected to HPLC- or nanoLC-MS/MS analysis.

The HPLC-MS/MS analysis was performed by coupling an Agilent 1100 HPLC system (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, CA, USA) to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (API5000; Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) equipped with Turbo V ion source (Applied Biosystems). Samples equivalent to 3.33–33.3 μg protein were injected onto either an Agilent 300SB-C18 (0.5 × 150 mm, 5.0 μm) or a Waters XBridge BEH130 C18 (1.0 × 100 mm, 3.5 μm) column together with 500 fmol of internal standard peptides. Mobile phases A and B consisted of 0.1% formic acid in water and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile, respectively. The peptides were separated and eluted from the column at 20–25°C using a linear gradient with a 120-min run time at a flow rate of 50 μL/min. The sequence was as follows: (A : B), 99 : 1 for 5 min after injection, 50 : 50 at 55 min, 0 : 100 at 56 min and up to 58 min, 99 : 1 at 60 min and up to 120 min.

The nanoLC-MS/MS analysis was performed by coupling a nanoLC system (LC Assist, Tokyo, Japan) to a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (4000QTRAP; Applied Biosystems) equipped with NanoSpray source (Applied Biosystems) and AD-H4 (AMR, Tokyo, Japan). Together with 50 fmol of internal standard peptides, samples equivalent to 0.50–5.0 μg protein were injected onto a direct nano flow spray tip reversed-phase column (0.15 × 50 mm) packed with Mightysil RP-18GP (3 μm particles; Kanto Chemicals, Tokyo, Japan), which was connected through an electric column-switching valve and an automated solvent desalting device. Mobile phases A and B consisted of 0.1% formic acid in water and 0.1% formic acid in acetonitrile, respectively. The peptides were separated and eluted from the column at 20–25°C using a linear gradient of 5–45% B for 50 min at a flow rate of 100 nL/min.

The eluted peptides were simultaneously and selectively detected by means of electro-spray ionization in a multiplexed MRM mode, which can quantify many molecules simultaneously by using 300 MRM transitions (Q1/Q3) at maximum. The dwell time was 10 msec per MRM transition. Each molecule was monitored with four sets of MRM transitions (Q1/Q3-1, Q1/Q3-2, Q1/Q3-3, Q1/Q3-4) derived from one set of standard and internal standard peptides (Tables S1 and S2). Chromatogram ion counts were determined by using the data acquisition procedures in Analyst software version 1.4.2 (Applied Biosystems). Signal peaks with a peak area count of over 5000 detected at the same retention time as an internal standard peptide were defined as positive. When positive peaks were observed in three or four sets of MRM transitions, the molecules were considered to be expressed in brain microvessels, and then the protein expression amounts were determined as the average of three or four quantitative values. Kamiie et al. (2008) have established that the protein expression amounts gave coefficients of variation of less than 20.0% when determined from three peaks with peak area counts of over 5000.

The limit of quantification (LQ, fmol/μg protein) of non-detected molecules in the isolated brain microvessels was defined as the protein concentration which would give a peak area count of 5000 in the chromatogram of microvessel samples. When the calibration curve was obtained with eqn 1, the amount (fmol) of target protein equivalent to a peak area count of 5000 (ATarget eq 5000) was calculated by means of eqn 2 from the peak area (counts) of internal standard peptide in microvessel samples (PAIS in Microvessel) and the values of slope and intercept in eqn 1. Then, the limit of quantification was obtained with eqn 3 by dividing ATarget eq 5000 by the total protein amount (μg protein) of the isolated brain microvessels analyzed (AMicrovessel).

  • image(1)
  • image(2)
  • image(3)

where PASt in Authentic and PAIS in Authentic are the peak areas (counts) of standard peptide and internal standard peptide in authentic samples, respectively, and ASt in Authentic is the amount (fmol) of standard peptide in authentic samples.

Before the measurements, the MRM transitions were determined from MS/MS spectra obtained by direct infusion of 1 μM peptide solution at a flow rate of 5 μL/min with a syringe pump (Harvard) into the mass spectrometer. The declustering potentials and collision energies were optimized to maximize signal strength.

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

Isolated brain microvessels from human brain

Human brain microvessels were isolated from frozen brain cortexes of seven donors who had died of peripheral diseases (Table 1). Microscopic analysis confirmed that the preparations from all the donors contained predominantly microvessels (Fig. 1). The purity of the brain microvessel preparations was also evaluated by measuring the protein expression levels of gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, which is an endothelial marker localized on luminal membrane of brain capillaries, and Na+/K+-ATPase, which is localized on abluminal membrane (Cornford and Hyman 2005). Both proteins were detected in the preparations from all the donors measured (not measured in donor 4 and 6 for gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase), and their protein expression amounts in humans were not significantly different from the reported values in mice; the difference was within 1.22-fold (Kamiie et al. 2008) (Table 2). This suggests that the purity of the isolated human brain microvessels was similar to that of the mouse brain microvessels.

Table 1.   Donor information
Donor no.AgeGenderRaceCause of deathPostmortem interval (h)Brain regionBrain microvessel isolation method
  1. Brain cortex of donor number 7 was kindly provided by Tohoku University Hospital. The other six brain cortexes were purchased from Analytical Biological Services (ABS) in the USA.

116MaleCaucasianMosier syndrome3–6CortexNylon mesh
263MaleCaucasianGastric cancer4CortexNylon mesh
365MaleCaucasianColon cancer5CortexNylon mesh
466MaleCaucasianMouth cancer1.5CortexNylon mesh
574MaleCaucasianChronic obstructive pulmonary disease4CortexNylon mesh
677MaleCaucasianColon cancer3.5CortexNylon mesh
777MaleJapaneseGuillain-Barré syndrome (clinical diagnosis)2CortexGlass bead column
image

Figure 1.  Photographs of microvessels isolated from human brain cortexes. (a, b) The microvessels were isolated from frozen brain cortex by the nylon mesh method. The photographs of donor 1 are representive of six donors (donors 1–6). (c, d) The microvessels were isolated from frozen brain cortex of donor number 7 by the glass bead column method. (a, c) 10× magnification, scale bar = 200 μm. (b, d) 20× magnification, scale bar = 100 μm.

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Table 2.   Protein expression amounts of endothelial marker γ-GTP and membrane marker Na+/K+-ATPase in human and mouse isolated brain microvessels (fmol/μg protein)
Gene symbolNylon meshGlass bead columnMax/MinAverage of 7 donorsMouseFold difference Human/mouse
1234567
  1. Brain microvessels of donor number 7 were isolated by means of the glass bead column method. The other six brain microvessels were isolated according to the nylon mesh method. Whole tissue lysates of human brain microvessels were digested with trypsin as described in ‘Materials and methods’. The protein expression amounts were measured by subjecting the digests to LC-MS/MS with internal standard peptides. Max/Min was calculated by dividing the highest protein expression amounts by the lowest protein expression amounts among the seven donors. The protein expression amounts of γ-GTP and Na+/K+-ATPase in mouse isolated brain microvessels were taken from Kamiie et al. 2008. Fold difference (human/mouse) was calculated by dividing the average protein expression amount of the seven donors by that in isolated mouse brain microvessels. The data for each donor represent the mean ± SEM (number of experiments = 4–12). The data for the average of seven donors and for mouse represent the mean ± SD (number of donors = 5–7; number of mouse samples = 6). a> 0.05, not significantly different from the protein expression amounts in mouse isolated brain microvessels.

Endothelial marker, luminal membrane
γ-GTP2.69 ± 0.054.09 ± 0.993.91 ± 0.44Not measured4.23 ± 0.32Not measured2.93 ± 0.401.573.57 ± 0.71a4.37 ± 0.860.817
Membrane marker, abluminal membrane
Na+/K+-ATPase24.7 ± 1.826.9 ± 2.825.9 ± 1.127.9 ± 1.258.6 ± 3.337.5 ± 7.344.3 ± 3.42.3735.1 ± 12.6a39.4 ± 2.20.891

Quantitative protein expression profile of membrane transporters and receptors in isolated human brain microvessels

The protein expression amounts of 112 molecules, including 34 ABC transporters, 66 SLC transporters and eight receptors, were examined by quantitative targeted absolute proteomics in the isolated microvessels from seven donors. Twenty proteins were quantitated (Table 3), whereas the other 92 molecules were not detected in any of the donors (Table 4).

Table 3.   Protein expression amounts of transporters and receptors in isolated human brain microvessels
Gene symbolAliasProtein expression amount (fmol/μg protein)
1234567Max/MinAverage of 7 donors
  1. Brain microvessels of donor number 7 were isolated by means of the glass bead column method. The other six brain microvessels were isolated according to the nylon mesh method. Whole tissue lysates of human brain microvessels were digested with trypsin as described in ‘Materials and methods’. The protein expression amounts were measured by subjecting the digests to LC-MS/MS with internal standard peptides. Max/Min was calculated by dividing the highest protein expression amounts by the lowest protein expression amounts among the seven donors. For ABCA8, SUR1, LAT1 and RFC, Max/Min was calculated by dividing the highest protein expression amounts by the limit of quantification (0.823, 0.142, 0.263 and 0.574 fmol/μg protein, respectively). The protein expression amount of GLUT3, 14 represents the total amount of GLUT3 and GLUT14, because the amino acid sequence of the probe peptide is common for the two molecules. The data for each donor represent the mean ± SEM (number of experiments = 4–12). The data for the average of seven donors represent the mean ± SD (number of donors = 4–7). ULQ, under limit of quantification. ABC, ATP-binding cassette; BGT, betaine-GABA transporter; BCRP, breast cancer resistance protein; CAT1, cationic amino acid transporter 1; EAAT1, excitatory amino acid transporter 1; ENT1, equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1; GLUT, glucose transporters; INSR, insulin receptor; LAT1, L-type amino acid transporter 1; LRP1, low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1; MCT1, monocarboxylate transporter 1; MRP, multidrug resistance-associated protein; OAT, organic anion transporters; RFC, reduced folate carrier; SLC, solute carrier; TfR1, transferrin receptor 1.

ABC transporters
 ABCA2ABC22.58 ± 0.623.39 ± 0.353.69 ± 0.523.06 ± 0.982.57 ± 0.312.80 ± 0.171.96 ± 0.291.882.86 ± 0.58
 ABCA8ABCA8ULQ1.44 ± 0.200.896 ± 0.168ULQ1.18 ± 0.15ULQ1.33 ± 0.72> 1.751.21 ± 0.24
 ABCB1MDR19.25 ± 0.867.00 ± 0.764.96 ± 0.644.67 ± 0.435.85 ± 0.676.29 ± 0.944.40 ± 0.402.106.06 ± 1.69
 ABCC4MRP40.327 ± 0.0590.170 ± 0.0290.179 ± 0.0210.128 ± 0.0560.182 ± 0.0240.139 ± 0.0600.241 ± 0.0232.560.195 ± 0.069
 ABCC8SUR1ULQULQULQULQULQULQ0.277 ± 0.047> 1.950.277
 ABCG2BCRP8.79 ± 0.669.99 ± 0.617.54 ± 0.433.81 ± 0.177.78 ± 0.4410.9 ± 0.58.16 ± 0.642.868.14 ± 2.26
SLC transporters
 SLC1A3EAAT110.6 ± 1.017.6 ± 1.123.6 ± 2.416.9 ± 2.738.5 ± 2.019.5 ± 1.744.9 ± 3.84.2424.5 ± 12.5
 SLC2A1GLUT1216 ± 11168 ± 6128 ± 580.4 ± 11.1158 ± 695.4 ± 5.5128 ± 62.69139 ± 46
 SLC2A3,14GLUT3,143.04 ± 0.354.04 ± 0.344.55 ± 0.393.52 ± 0.505.19 ± 0.404.46 ± 0.716.01 ± 0.521.984.40 ± 1.00
 SLC3A24F2hc5.04 ± 1.183.49 ± 0.333.55 ± 0.372.69 ± 0.393.68 ± 0.292.46 ± 0.353.40 ± 0.172.053.47 ± 0.83
 SLC6A12BGT14.15 ± 0.633.56 ± 0.533.36 ± 1.08Not measured1.63 ± 0.19Not measured3.10 ± 0.232.553.16 ± 0.94
 SLC7A1CAT11.31 ± 0.141.05 ± 0.081.11 ± 0.09Not measured1.29 ± 0.06Not measured0.889 ± 0.2131.471.13 ± 0.18
 SLC7A5LAT10.534 ± 0.0570.430 ± 0.0580.285 ± 0.022ULQ0.467 ± 0.214ULQ0.441 ± 0.120> 2.030.431 ± 0.091
 SLC16A1MCT12.44 ± 0.462.78 ± 0.312.41 ± 0.203.27 ± 0.191.16 ± 0.092.79 ± 0.301.03 ± 0.163.182.27 ± 0.85
 SLC19A1RFC0.773 ± 0.1460.813 ± 0.147ULQULQ0.748 ± 0.131ULQ0.716 ± 0.184> 1.420.763 ± 0.041
 SLC29A1ENT10.810 ± 0.0700.593 ± 0.0520.472 ± 0.0480.437 ± 0.1260.550 ± 0.0540.661 ± 0.0790.455 ± 0.0421.850.568 ± 0.134
Receptors
 INSR 0.894 ± 0.2071.18 ± 0.100.903 ± 0.0811.49 ± 0.391.10 ± 0.210.942 ± 0.0551.10 ± 0.121.671.09 ± 0.21
 LRP1 2.04 ± 0.191.43 ± 0.101.43 ± 0.261.27 ± 0.171.65 ± 0.121.39 ± 0.161.38 ± 0.211.611.51 ± 0.26
 TfR1 2.14 ± 0.213.15 ± 0.172.97 ± 0.252.73 ± 0.162.72 ± 0.181.48 ± 0.221.20 ± 0.072.632.34 ± 0.76
Table 4.   Molecules under the limit of quantification
MoleculeLQ fmol/μg proteinMoleculeLQ fmol/μg proteinMoleculeLQ fmol/μg protein
  1. These molecules were not detected in LC-MS/MS. The limits of quantification (LQ) were calculated for the protein expression level in the isolated brain microvessels according to eqns1–3 described in ‘Materials and methods’. ABC, ATP-binding cassette; MCT2, monocarboxylate transporter 2; EAAT3, excitatory amino acid transporter 3; MRP, multidrug resistance-associated protein; OAT, organic anion transporters; OATP, organic anion-transporting polypeptide; PEPT, peptide transporter.

Human
ABC transporters
 ABCA10.223ABCB40.187MRP70.117
 ABCA30.191ABCB50.244MRP80.317
 ABCA40.196BSEP0.314MRP90.199
 ABCA50.494MRP10.211ABCC130.699
 ABCA60.434MRP20.193ABCG10.100
 ABCA70.530MRP30.326ABCG40.0546
 ABCA90.245MRP50.497ABCG50.921
 ABCA100.881MRP60.174ABCG80.102
 ABCA120.174CFTR0.417  
 ABCA130.154SUR20.733  
SLC transporters
 EAAT30.256OATP-D0.254OCTL10.699
 ASCT20.142OATP-E0.758OCTL20.527
 GLUT40.136OATP-F0.208FLIPT10.101
 NET0.441OATP-H0.210CT20.122
 SERT0.116OATP-I0.0820BOIT0.503
 TAUT0.0767OATP-J0.0610SLC22A180.345
 CRT10.0915OATP-80.572CNT10.308
 GAT20.374OCT10.288CNT20.141
 LAT20.0590OCT20.123CNT30.552
 xCT0.429OCT30.207ENT20.180
 NTCP0.454OCTN10.123PMAT0.191
 ASBT0.120OCTN20.288ATA10.175
 PEPT10.379OAT10.909ATA20.143
 PEPT20.216OAT20.153ATA30.0656
 MCT20.277OAT30.348PCFT0.419
 PGT0.186OAT40.243MATE10.330
 OATP-A0.695OAT50.0898MATE2-K0.295
 OATP-B0.337UST30.326  
 OATP-C0.350URAT10.0566  
Others
 OSTα0.292FcR0.217NPR-B0.402
 OSTβ0.162LRP21.32NPR-C0.141
 RLIP760.730NPR-A0.762CD1470.0828
Mouse
 abca20.178abca8b0.0324glut30.607
 abca8a0.144abca90.752  

Among ABC transporters, BCRP was the most abundant, followed by MDR1, ABCA2 and ABCA8. Among SLC transporters and receptors, excitatory amino acid transporter 1 (EAAT1) and glucose transporter (GLUT) 1 were expressed at the highest levels, while GLUT3/14, 4F2hc, betaine-GABA transporter (BGT1), cationic amino acid transporter 1 (CAT1), monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) and transcytosis receptors [insulin receptor (INSR), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1) and transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1)] were expressed at levels in the range of 1.09–4.40 fmol/μg protein. The amounts of LAT1, reduced folate carrier (RFC) and equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) were less than 1 fmol/μg protein. No protein expression was observed for drug transporters such as peptide transporters (PEPTs), organic anion transporters (OATs), organic anion-transporting polypeptides (OATPs), organic cation transporters (OCTs), organic cation/carnitine transporters (OCTNs) and multidrug and toxic compound extrusions (MATEs). The largest individual difference in the protein expression amounts between donors was 4.24-fold, which was observed in case of EAAT1 between donors 1 and 7. Protein expression of MRP1 and prostaglandin transporter (PGT), which were reported to be highly expressed in pericytes compared to brain capillary endothelial cells (Berezowski et al. 2004; Kis et al. 2006), was not detected.

Comparison of quantitative protein expression profiles of human and mouse isolated brain microvessels

To examine species difference in the roles of membrane transporters and receptors at the BBB, the protein expression amounts in the isolated human brain microvessels were compared with those in mouse brain microvessels (Table 5). Among drug transporters, BCRP protein was expressed at a significantly higher (1.85-fold) level in humans than in mice, while ABCA8 protein was detected only in humans. In contrast, the protein expression amounts of MDR1 and MRP4 were significantly smaller, 2.33- and 8.15-fold, respectively, in humans than in mice, and those of OAT3 and OATP-F were at least 5.66- and 11.6-fold smaller, respectively. Furthermore, the protein expression amounts of OATP-A and OATP-B in humans were at least 3.04- and 6.26-fold smaller than that of the possible mouse homologue oatp-2, respectively. Transporters of endogenous compounds also showed significant differences in protein expression amounts between human and mouse brain microvessels: the expression levels of 4F2hc, LAT1 and MCT1 in humans were 4.73-, 5.08- and 10.4-fold smaller than those in mice, respectively.

Table 5.   Comparison of protein expression amounts between human- and mouse-isolated brain microvessels
Moleculefmol/μg proteinFold difference Human/mouse
HumanMouse
  1. Human data are taken from Table 3 (average of the seven donors) and Table 4 (limit of quantification). Mouse data for bcrp, mdr1a, oatp-2, oat3, mrp4, oatp-14, glut1, 4f2hc, lat1, mct1, asct2 and taut were taken from Kamiie et al. (2008). Mouse bcrp and mdr1a protein expression amounts were cited as averages of quantitative values obtained with two sets of probe peptides. Mouse data for abca8b, abca8a, abca9, abca2, glut3, lrp1, insr, abca1, ent1, tfr1 and cd147 were determined in this study. Fold difference was calculated by dividing the protein expression amount in isolated human brain microvessels by that in isolated mouse brain microvessels. Nomenclature is given in capital letters for the human homolog and lower-case letters for the mouse homolog. Mouse abca8a, abca8b and abca9 are possible homologs of human ABCA8. Human OATP-A and OATP-B are possible homologues of mouse oatp-2 at the BBB. The data represent the mean ± SD (number of donors = 5–7; number of mouse samples = 6). ULQ, under the limit of quantification. *< 0.01, **< 0.001, significantly different from the protein expression amounts in mouse isolated brain microvessels.

Drug transporters
Human > Mouse
 ABCA8/abca8b1.21 ± 0.24ULQ (< 0.0324)> 37.4
 ABCA8/abca8a1.21 ± 0.24ULQ (< 0.144)> 8.40
 BCRP/bcrp8.14 ± 2.26*4.41 ± 0.691.85
 ABCA8/abca91.21 ± 0.24ULQ (< 0.752)> 1.61
Human < Mouse
 MDR1/mdr1a6.06 ± 1.69**14.1 ± 2.10.430
 OATP-A/oatp-2ULQ (< 0.695)2.11 ± 0.28< 0.329
 OAT3/oat3ULQ (< 0.348)1.97 ± 0.11< 0.177
 OATP-B/oatp-2ULQ (< 0.337)2.11 ± 0.28< 0.160
 MRP4/mrp40.195 ± 0.069**1.59 ± 0.220.123
 OATP-F/oatp-14ULQ (< 0.208)2.41 ± 0.25< 0.0863
Transporters for endogenous compounds and receptors
Human > Mouse
 ABCA2/abca22.86 ± 0.58ULQ (< 0.178)> 16.1
 GLUT3,14/glut34.40 ± 1.00ULQ (< 0.607)> 7.25
 GLUT1/glut1139 ± 4690.0 ± 4.51.55
 LRP1/lrp11.51 ± 0.261.07 ± 0.381.41
Human < Mouse
 INSR/insr1.09 ± 0.211.16 ± 0.740.937
 ABCA1/abca1ULQ (< 0.223)0.298 ± 0.098< 0.782
 ENT1/ent10.568 ± 0.1340.985 ± 0.3630.577
 TfR1/tfr12.34 ± 0.76**5.84 ± 0.870.401
 4F2hc/4f2hc3.47 ± 0.83**16.4 ± 1.10.212
 LAT1/lat10.431 ± 0.091**2.19 ± 0.210.197
 MCT1/mct12.27 ± 0.85**23.7 ± 1.60.0957
 ASCT2/asct2ULQ (< 0.142)1.58 ± 0.06< 0.0899
 TAUT/tautULQ (< 0.0767)3.81 ± 0.64< 0.0201
 CD147/cd147ULQ (< 0.0828)19.5 ± 4.3< 0.00425

Discussion

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

The present study is the first to determine comprehensively the quantitative protein expression profiles of membrane transporters and receptors in human isolated brain microvessels, and to evaluate species differences in the protein expression profiles between human and mouse BBBs. Among drug transporters, BCRP showed the most abundant protein expression in humans, and its expression level was greater in humans than in mice, whereas the expression levels of MDR1/mdr1a and MRP4 were smaller in humans than in mice.

BCRP is involved in the brain-to-blood efflux of various xenobiotics at the BBB (Breedveld et al. 2005; Enokizono et al. 2008). Functional and expressional analysis has shown that, in mouse, BCRP has a less significant influence on drug efflux from brain as compared with MDR1 (Enokizono et al. 2008; Kamiie et al. 2008). However, the relative importance of BCRP and MDR1 in human BBB has remained unknown, because no functional study with PET or SPECT has been conducted for BCRP in the human BBB. At the mRNA level, BCRP is expressed at a higher level than MDR1 in isolated human brain microvessels, while a human BBB model cell line (hCMEC/D3) expressed MDR1 more abundantly than BCRP in vitro (Dauchy et al. 2008, 2009; Carl et al. 2010). Our results show that the protein expression amount of BCRP is 1.34-fold greater than that of MDR1 in isolated human brain microvessels (Table 3). In contrast, bcrp expression was only 31.3% of mdr1a expression in mouse brain microvessels (Kamiie et al. 2008). These results suggest that the functional role of BCRP relative to MDR1 is greater in the human BBB than in the mouse BBB.

As shown in Table 5, BCRP is considered to have 1.85-fold greater transport function in human BBB than in mouse BBB, on the assumption that the intrinsic transport activity (transport rate per protein) of BCRP is the same in humans and mice. Various BCRP substrates, including imatinib, gefitinib, erlotinib, mitoxantrone and topotecan (Kusuhara and Sugiyama 2009; Urquhart and Kim 2009), have been used for the treatment of glioblastoma, but their therapeutic benefit is minimal (Wen and Kesari 2008). In contrast, temozolomide is effective and is generally used as a first-line drug for glioma patients (Wen and Kesari 2008). Temozolomide is not transported well by human BCRP (de Vries 2009). Therefore, we speculate that the high efflux activity of BCRP at the human BBB is one of the reasons for the limited pharmacological activity of these anti-cancer agents, other than temozolomide, against glioblastoma.

In contrast to BCRP, the protein expression of MDR1 in humans was significantly smaller (2.33-fold) than in mice (Table 5). PET analysis showed that the brain-to-plasma ratios of MDR1 substrates [11C]GR205171 and [18F]altanserin were 8.6- and 4.5-fold greater in humans compared to rodents, respectively (Syvanen et al. 2009), suggesting that MDR1 is functionally less active in human BBB than in rodent BBB. The decreased protein expression amount presumably accounts at least in part for the decreased function of MDR1 in human BBB. Decreased intrinsic transport may also play a role, although the intrinsic transport activity is unknown because the amount of MDR1/mdr1a protein has never been quantified before. These considerations suggest that further studies on species differences in intrinsic transport activity by using our quantitative targeted absolute proteomics method are likely to be fruitful.

MRP4 and OAT3 are well-characterized organic anion transporters at the rodent BBB, and, in vivo experiments with gene knockout mice have shown that mrp4 and oat3 play roles in drug efflux from brain to blood (Uchida et al. 2007; Ose et al. 2009). The present study shows that protein expression of MRP4 is significantly smaller (8.1-fold) in humans than in mice, and that of OAT3 is at least 5.7-fold smaller (Table 5), raising the possibility that the efflux activities of MRP4 and OAT3 are low in human BBB compared with mouse BBB. Homovanillic acid, a major metabolite of dopamine, was reported to be eliminated from the brain by OAT3 (Mori et al. 2003). The homovanillic acid concentration in brain striatum is higher in humans (3.24–7.20 μg/g brain) than in mice (0.31–1.45 μg/g brain) (Sharman 1966; Adolfsson et al. 1979; Irifune et al. 1997). This could support the view that the lower efflux activity of OAT3 in humans is due at least in part to the lower protein expression of OAT3 in humans. Furthermore, Ro64-0802, an active form of the anti-influenza virus agent oseltamivir, undergoes active efflux mediated by OAT3 and MRP4 at the BBB (Ose et al. 2009). Recently, abnormal behavior has been reported in teenagers or younger people prescribed oseltamivir, although rodent study showed no specific CNS or behavioural effects after administration of doses corresponding to at least 100 times the clinical dose (Toovey et al. 2008). Ro64-0802 is suspected to be one of the major causes of the CNS adverse effects in humans, because it is 30 times more potent than oseltamivir (Izumi et al. 2007). Hence, a possible explanation for oseltamivir toxicity in humans may be that low expression of MRP4 and OAT3 in the human BBB results in reduced efflux of Ro64-0802 from the brain, leading to greater accumulation in the brain, which in turn induces adverse effects on the CNS.

As was the case for OAT and MRP family members, except for MRP4, no protein expression was observed for all the OATP subtypes (Table 4), which transport a variety of amphipathic drugs including hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors, angiotensin-receptor blockers, fluoroquinolones, steroids, β-blockers and synthetic peptides deltorphin II and D-penicillamine (2,5)-enkephalin (Urquhart and Kim 2009). Although OATP-A was detected in the brain capillaries of normal human brain cortex in an immunohistochemical study (Gao et al. 2000), the present study showed that the amount is no more than 0.695 fmol/μg protein. OATP-B was reported to be localized at the capillaries of human gliomas (Bronger et al. 2005), but we found that the amount of OATP-B in isolated human brain microvessels was as low as that of OATP-A. Oatp-2 is a possible mouse homolog of OATP-A and OATP-B, but we found that the amounts of OATP-A and OATP-B in humans were at least 3.0- and 6.3-fold less than that of oatp2 in mice, respectively (Table 5). These findings would suggest that OATP-mediated transport across human BBB is less active than that across mouse BBB, as would also be the case for OAT and MRP family members. Functional studies with in vivo imaging technologies such as PET and SPECT should also be informative to investigate the in vivo functions of OATP, OAT and MRP subtypes at the human BBB.

Interestingly, ABCA8 protein was detected in human brain microvessels in the amount of 1.21 fmol/μg protein, a level similar to those of mrp4, oat3 and oatp-2 in mouse brain microvessels (Table 5). An in vitro experiment using the Xenopus oocyte expression system indicated that ABCA8 transports organic anions, including estradiol-17β-D-glucuronide, taurocholate, ochratoxinA and digoxin (Tsuruoka et al. 2002). These compounds are also substrates of rodent mrp4, oat3 and oatp-2 (Kusuhara et al. 1999; Ohtsuki and Terasaki 2007). Hence, ABCA8 could play a similar role to mouse mrp4, oat3 and oatp-2 as an organic anion transporter if the intrinsic transport activity is close to those of mouse mrp4, oat3 and oatp-2.

In addition to drug transporters, transporters of endogenous compounds were also analyzed for species differences in protein expression amounts (Table 5). Among the glucose transporters, GLUT3 showed a remarkable species difference, with the protein amounts being at least 7.25-fold greater in human than in mouse isolated brain microvessels. By contrast, the amount of GLUT1 in human was not significantly different from that in mouse. At the functional level, PET studies found that the maximal velocity of glucose transport at the human BBB (0.4–2.0 μmol/min/g brain) was not significantly different from that at the rodent BBB (1.42 μmol/min/g brain) (Pardridge 1983; Gruetter et al. 1996). Therefore, glucose supply into the brain is likely to be mainly mediated by GLUT1 at the BBB.

System L, corresponding to LAT1 and 4F2hc, supplies large neutral amino acids including leucine, tryptophan, tyrosine and phenylalanine to the brain. The expression amounts of LAT1 and 4F2hc were both significantly lower (fivefold) in human than mouse isolated brain microvessels (Table 5). This result is consistent with the decreased maximum rate of phenylalanine uptake by isolated brain microvessels of humans compared with rodents, although there were large variations of Vmax and Km in human (Choi and Pardridge 1986). Furthermore, the cerebral protein synthesis rate in human brain (0.345–0.614 nmol/min/g) has been estimated to be lower than that in rodent brain (3.38 nmol/min/g) by PET using L-[1-11C]leucine and a three-compartment model (Hawkins et al. 1989), and the brain concentration of serotonin generated from tryptophan has been shown to be lower in humans than that in mice (e.g. 20 ng/g vs. 679 ng/g brain in the frontal cortex) (Young et al. 1994; Irifune et al. 1997). Cerebral protein and serotonin synthesis are likely affected by amino acid availability in the brain and tryptophan transport into the brain, respectively (Fernstrom and Wurtman 1972; Lajtha 1974; Pratt 1976; Pardridge and Oldendorf 1977). Therefore, the supply of amino acids via system L at the human BBB could be smaller than that at the mouse BBB, in accordance with the measured protein expression amounts of LAT1 and 4F2hc. No significant difference in an influx rate of amino acids at the BBB has been observed between humans and rodents using L-[1-11C]tyrosine, [11C]aminocyclohexanecarboxylate and L-[U-14C]phenylalanine (Koeppe et al. 1990; Wiesel et al. 1991; Nakamichi et al. 1993). However, system L is estimated to be over 90% saturated by plasma concentrations of amino acids under physiological conditions (del Amo et al. 2008), suggesting that the influx rate of PET probes would have been affected by the plasma concentrations of endogenous system L substrates, including amino acids. Therefore, the species differences in system L function at the BBB remain unclear and further studies are necessary to clarify in vivo system L function at the BBB.

Like LAT1 and 4F2hc, MCT1, which supplies lactate and ketone bodies to the brain, is also associated with the chaperone protein CD147. It has been reported that the protein levels of MCT1 are regulated by CD147, but the mRNA levels are not (Philp et al. 2003), suggesting that the mRNA and protein levels of MCT1 are not always correlated. Indeed, mRNA expression of MCT1 in brain decreased by fivefold from the postnatal day 15 to 60 (Pellerin et al. 1998), whereas the protein expression decreased by 25-fold from the postnatal day 17 to adult in the brain capillaries (Leino et al. 1999). Also, a ketogenic diet up-regulated the mRNA expression of MCT1 by threefold in rat hippocampus compared with the normal diet (Noh et al. 2004), whereas the protein expression was up-regulated by eightfold in the brain capillaries (Leino et al. 2001). Therefore, the quantitative analysis of protein levels, rather than in mRNA levels, may be preferable for understanding the role of MCT1 in human development and the effect of a ketogenic diet.

The peptide probes of 92 target molecules were not detected in the human brain microvessels, suggesting that the protein expression amounts of these 92 molecules were under the limits of quantification listed in Table 4. However, we cannot completely exclude the possibility that the expressions of some proteins were overlooked or underestimated, because the following two possibilities cannot be ruled out. Firstly, there might be unreported modifications or mutations involving the targeted peptides in the 92 molecules, which would have resulted in failure to detect the targeted peptides, although we checked that no relevant gene mutation or post-translational modification in the target peptide was registered in the UniProtKB database. Secondly, some molecules may have been insufficiently solubilized and digested with trypsin. We have validated the efficient solubilization and digestion of glut1 in mouse brain microvessels and human MDR1 in MDR1-over-expressed cells by comparing quantification values obtained with the present method and with binding assays, including immunoblotting (Kamiie et al. 2008). Furthermore, no bands over 20 kDa were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate–polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis after trypsin digestion. The results suggest that the solubilization and trypsin digestion proceeded efficiently, but do not necessarily indicate complete solubilization and digestion of all molecules.

Immunohistochemical analyses have shown that MRP1, MRP5, OATP-A, OATP-B and RLIP76 are localized in human brain microvessels (Nies et al. 2004; Awasthi et al. 2005; Bronger et al. 2005), but these were not detected in the LC-MS/MS. As noted above, there are several possible reasons for this difference, and it is not necessarily the case that the protein levels were under the limit of quantification of our method. However, OATP-A and OATP-B were immunohistochemically detected in the microvessels of brain tumors. Therefore, it is possible that protein expression of OATP-A and OATP-B might be induced in brain tumors. Furthermore, OATP-A has been detected in monkey brain microvessels (0.724 fmol/μg protein) by using the peptide at the same position, although one amino acid is different in the monkey OATP-A peptide (Ito et al. 2011). This finding suggests that OATP-A protein in human microvessels would have been efficiently digested by trypsin, but that the protein level was indeed under the limit of quantification.

In the present study, brain microvessels were isolated as described previously (Dauchy et al. 2008) with minor modifications. In the method validation by Dauchy et al. (2008), the mRNA expression levels of neuron and astrocyte markers, but not pericyte markers, were shown to be significantly reduced in the isolated fraction compared with those in cerebral cortex. Therefore, neurons and astrocytes are likely to have been efficiently removed from the isolated fraction used in the present study. As regards pericytes, our isolated microvessels did not show detectable protein expression of MRP1 and PGT (Table 4) which were reported to be highly expressed in pericytes compared with brain capillary endothelial cells (Berezowski et al. 2004; Kis et al. 2006). This suggests that the extent of pericyte contamination is limited.

Generally, inter-individual differences in expression amounts were small, although EAAT1 showed a 4.24-fold difference at maximum (Table 3). ABCA8, sulfonylurea receptor 1 (SUR1), LAT1 and RFC were not detected in some donors, but their limits of quantification were close to the expression amounts found in other donors (< twofold difference), so it possible that these four transporters also do not show large inter-individual differences in their levels. According to a recent LC-MS/MS-based absolute quantification analysis, the protein expression amounts of cytochrome P450 in human liver microsomes were remarkably different among individuals, for example, over 20-fold differences for CYP1A2, 2A6, 2C19 and 3A4 (Kawakami et al. 2011). Additionally, protein expression of MRP2 showed a sixfold variation among individuals in the liver membrane fraction (Li et al. 2009). Compared with these differences in liver, the inter-individual differences in protein expression amounts of transporters and receptors in isolated human brain microvessels are quite small.

In conclusion, the present study has comprehensively elucidated the absolute protein expression profile of transporters and receptors in isolated human brain microvessels. Comparison of the results with mouse data revealed clear species differences between humans and mice. Furthermore, these differences are likely consistent with reported species differences in physiological phenomena and pharmacokinetics in the brain. These quantitative protein expression profiles would be important to increase our understanding of drug penetration into human brain, homeostatic mechanisms of endogenous compounds in human brain, and their species differences. As intrinsic transport activities, as well as protein expression amounts, affect the functions of transporters and receptors, further study to clarify the intrinsic transport activities is necessary to fully understand the brain distribution of drugs and endogenous compounds in humans.

Acknowledgements

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

We thank A. Niitomi, Y. Yoshikawa and K. Tsukiura for secretarial assistance. This study was supported in part by Grant-in-Aids for Scientific Research (S) 18109002 and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Fellows 20·7291 from the JSPS, and a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Priority Area 17081002 from The Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT), Japan. This study was also supported in part by the Industrial Technology Research Grant Program from New Energy and the Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

Conflict of interest

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

Tetsuya Terasaki and Sumio Ohtsuki are a full professor and an associate professor of Tohoku University, respectively, and are also directors of Proteomedix Frontiers. This research was not supported by Proteomedix Frontiers and their position at Proteomedix Frontiers does not present any financial conflicts. The other authors declared no conflict of interest.

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  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information
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Supporting Information

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Materials and methods
  4. Results
  5. Discussion
  6. Acknowledgements
  7. Conflict of interest
  8. References
  9. Supporting Information

Table  S1. Peptide probes and MRM transitions for human molecules.

Table  S2. Peptide probes and MRM transitions for mouse molecules.

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