SEX DISCRIMINATION IN HIRING: THE INFLUENCE OF ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE AND NEED FOR APPROVAL ON DECISION MAKING BEHAVIOR

Authors


  • Note. Ratings on a seven-point scale, higher numbers equal better fit, higher salary, etc, Entries with same superscript are significantly different from each other, p < .05.

  • This article is based on research that was conducted as part of the requirements of a Ph. D. in clinical psychology at Adelphi University (May, 1986). I wish to thank Dr. Barbara Cohen (Chairperson) and Dr. Martin Fisher for their assistance and guidance. In addition, Dr. Gail Petersen, Dr. Mattox Bailey, Dr. Joe Ruocco, Dr. George Strieker, Dr. Janice Steil, and Dr. Patrick Ross made many helpful suggestions.

  • A complete copy of the materials used to manipulate organizational climate, as well as the job description and application materials, is available from the author at Marylhurst College, Marylhurst, Oregon 97036.

Abstract

It was hypothesized that an organization's climate could inhibit or encourage discriminatory behavior, and that subjects’ need for approval would interact with climate to influence their decisions. One hundred and sixty-one male business students read one of two sets of materials intended to manipulate company climate, and then evaluated a fictitious resume of a male or female applicant for a managerial position within the company. Decisions regarding hire, salary, applicant fit with the company, and anticipated longevity were dependent measures. The hypothesis regarding organizational climate received partial support. In a discriminatory climate women applicants were evaluated less favorably than men in terms of likelihood of hire and degree of fit between the applicant and the organization. Although not statistically significant, a similar pattern of results was obtained on the salary measure and on the measure of applicant predicted longevity. Contrary to expectations, approval motivation was not related to the dependent measures.

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