FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH ACCULTURATIVE STRESS AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMATOLOGY AMONG MARRIED MEXICAN IMMIGRANT WOMEN

Authors


  • This article was based on data from the author's doctoral dissertation. The project was partially supported by the NIMH, Division of Biometry and Applied Sciences, Minority Research Resources Branch, Grant MH24854, and by a research grant from the Institute of American Cultures and the Chicano Studies Research Center of the University of California, Los Angeles.

  • Appreciation is extended to Margarita Maldonado and the staff of the SSMHRC for their assistance in the preparation of this article.

Requests for reprints should be sent to Nelly Salgado de Snyder, Spanish Speaking Mental Health Research Center; Department of Psychology, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90024-1563.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to describe levels of acculturative stress and individual stressors and their relationship to levels of depressive symptomatology among young Mexican immigrant women. The mean age of the respondents was 25.7 years with a mean of 9.4 years of education. Their age at migration was 18.5 years and their average length of stay in the United States was 7.5 years. Women who in the last three months experienced discrimination, sex-role conflicts, and concern about starting a family in this country had significantly higher (over 16) CES-D scores than women who did not report experiencing those situations. The overall findings suggest that this sample of Mexican women immigrants as a group are at risk for the development of psychological problems.

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