SEX-ROLE ORIENTATION, COPING STRATEGIES, AND SELF-EFFICACY OF WOMEN IN TRADITIONAL AND NON T RADITIONAL OCCUPATIONS

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  • A summary of this work has been presented at the Canadian Psychological Association 48th Annual Convention, Vancouver, BC, June, 1987.

Requests for reprints should be sent to: Bonita C. Long, 210-5780 Toronto Rd., Counselling Psychology Department, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1L2.

Abstract

Examined women's sex-role orientation, coping strategies, self-efficacy, and stress in male- and female-dominated occupations. Results (n=281) revealed that high-masculine women (measured by the Bern Sex Role Inventory), compared with low-masculine women, reported significantly lower scores on measures of anxiety and strain, with the exception of interpersonal strain. High-masculine women, compared with low-masculine women, reported greater problem- relative to emotion-focused coping and higher self-efficacy. Low-feminine women in nontraditional occupations reported higher self-efficacy and greater problem-focused coping compared with low-feminine women in traditional occupations. The relation between masculinity and strain was nonsignificant when the variance due to self-efficacy was partialed out, suggesting that the rela tionship between sex role and strain may be mediated by personal efficacy.

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