ARE WOMEN EVALUATED MORE FAVORABLY THAN MEN?

An Analysis of Attitudes, Beliefs, and Emotions

Authors


  • The research reported in this article was supported by National Science Foundation Grants BNS-8605256 and BNS-8807495. We thank Kurt Frey and Susan Rhudy for assistance in administering materials to subjects and recording data, and Wendy Wood and two anonymous reviewers for comments on a draft of the article.

Address reprint requests to: Alice H. Eagly, Department of Psychological Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Abstract

In an experiment in which male and female respondents evaluated the social category of women or men on several types of measures, analysis of respondents' attitudes toward the sexes and of the evaluative content of their beliefs established that they evaluated women more favorably than men. In addition, analysis of respondents' emotional reactions toward women and men did not yield evidence of negativity toward women at the emotional level. Nor did it appear that respondents' very positive evaluations of women masked ambivalence toward them. This research, therefore, provides strong evidence that women are evaluated quite favorably—in fact, more favorably than men.

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