EXPLORING A TEACHING/RESEARCH NEXUS AS A POSSIBLE SITE FOR FEMINIST METHODOLOGICAL INNOVATION IN PSYCHOLOGY

Authors


  • The author would like to thank Natilene Bowker, Sue D'Ath, Kristy Davies, Penny Dean, Susie Malcolm, Meredith Mora, Siann Nathan, Ann O'Sullivan, Wendy Sheddan, and Jo White. The success of the interviews was a result of their hard work and their enthusiasm motivated me to write this article. I would also like to thank Marsha Walton with whom I enjoyed many interesting discussions about feminist research and pedagogy in psychology.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Ann Weatherall, School of Psychology, Victoria University of Wellington, P.O. Box 600, Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail: Ann.Weatherall@vuw.ac.nz.

Abstract

In this article the links between feminist pedagogy and feminist research are used as a basis for exploring the potential that teaching about women and gender has a methodological resource for feminist research in psychology. Inspiration for this article stemmed from the author's experience of teaching a postgraduate class in Gender Issues in Psychology in New Zealand. An assessed task for the course required students to interview two women. The interviews were transcribed and the content summarized in a written report and an oral presentation. All parties involved with the project reported finding it an educational experience. The exercise is evaluated as an example of feminist research. The advantages and limitations of using the classroom as a resource for research by feminist psychologists are discussed.

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