CONFRONTING PERPETRATORS OF PREJUDICE: THE INHIBITORY EFFECTS OF SOCIAL COSTS

Authors


  • J. Nicole Shelton and Rebecca E. Stewart, Department of Psychology, Princeton University.

  • Support for this study came from an internal grant from Princeton University awarded to Rebecca Stewart. We are grateful to Dale Miller, Deborah Prentice, Jennifer Richeson, and Stephanie Rowley for their helpful comments on an earlier version of this paper.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Nicole Shelton, Department of Psychology, Green Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540. E-mail: nshelton@princeton.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this research is to investigate the extent to which social costs influence whether or not targets of prejudice confront individuals who behave in a prejudiced manner during interpersonal interactions. Consistent with our predictions, we found that although women believe they will confront perpetrators of prejudice regardless of the social costs, in reality, they are less likely to confront male perpetrators in high social cost situations. Implications for how targets cope with prejudice and discrimination are discussed.

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