DEMOGRAPHIC, PSYCHOLOGICAL, AND RELATIONSHIP FACTORS IN DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DURING PREGNANCY IN A SAMPLE OF LOW-INCOME WOMEN OF COLOR

Authors


  • Lynda M. Sagrestano, Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale; Doris Carroll, Angela C. Rodriguez, and Bahij Nuwayhid, Department of Maternal-Fetal Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago.

  • The research reported in this article was conducted through the generous support of the Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Grant-in-Aid program and the University of Illinois Women's Care Clinic. Lynda M. Sagrestano was supported, in part, by the NIMH Prevention Research Training Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (MH19933), and the Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, Office for Research and Development Administration Summer Research Fellowship Program. The authors would like to thank Alan Vaux, Amy Rogers, and the reviewers for helpful comments on earlier drafts of this article.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Lynda M. Sagrestano, Ph.D., Department of Psychology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL 62901-6502. E-mail: sagresta@siu.edu

Abstract

Research suggests that a significant number of women first experience domestic violence during pregnancy. The current study examines correlates of violence during pregnancy, first by comparing women who did and did not report violence, and second examining three subgroups of women who reported violence (violence initiated, violence persisted, violence ceased). Results indicated that controlling for demographics, more frequent violence was associated with less support and satisfaction with support from the baby's father, more negative interactions with the baby's father, and more verbal aggression in their relationships than those who did not report violence. Differences among subgroups of women reporting violence emerged only for the relationship variables. Implications for detecting violence in clinical settings are discussed.

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