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ARE ALL LATINAS THE SAME? PERCEIVED BREAST CANCER SCREENING BARRIERS AND FACILITATIVE CONDITIONS

Authors


  • Lydia P. Buki, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois; Evelinn A. Borrayo and Benjamin M. Feigal, Department of Psychology, Colorado State University; Iris Y. Carrillo, Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Lydia P. Buki, Ph.D., Department of Educational Psychology, University of Illinois, 1310 S. Sixth Street, MC-708, Champaign, IL 61820. E-mail: buki@uiuc.edu

Abstract

In this article, we examine perceived breast cancer screening barriers and facilitative conditions for immigrant women from Mexico, Puerto Rico, Cuba, El Salvador, and South America (N= 58). Focus groups conducted separately with women of each ancestry were analyzed using grounded theory methods. Identified barriers comprise secrecy, lack of information, embarrassment, fear, and distrust of health care providers. Perceived facilitative conditions include knowing the importance of early detection and noticing a symptom. We compare and contrast findings across ancestries and discuss how psychosocial and cultural factors could be better integrated into early detection programs. The women's high screening rates also suggest that breast cancer screening can be facilitated in this population by addressing institutional factors (e.g., access to health care, transportation).

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