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JEWISH WOMEN'S PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING: THE ROLE OF ATTACHMENT, SEPARATION, AND JEWISH IDENTITY

Authors


  • This study was funded in part by the Hyde Student Graduate Research Grant (Division 35 of the American Psychological Association). We extend our gratitude to Drs. Evelyn Torton Beck, Mary Ann Hoffman, Sue H. Kim, David A. Petersen, Lisa Goodman, and Barbara U. Hammer for their insightful comments and contributions to this project. An earlier version of this paper was presented at the annual convention of the American Psychological Association, Washington DC, 2000.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Julie L. Goldberg, Pace University Counseling Center, 156 William Street, 12th Floor, New York, NY 10038. E-mail: jgoldberg@pace.edu

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the contributions of attachment, separation, and Jewish identity to psychological well-being in a sample of 115 late adolescent Jewish women. Results from multiple regression analyses demonstrated that attachment to parents, separation from parents, and Jewish identity collectively accounted for variance in psychological distress, as measured by anxiety, depression, self-esteem problems, and interpersonal problems. Thus, late adolescent Jewish women's psychological functioning may be fostered by therapeutic interventions addressing their relationships with parents and Jewish identity.

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