REVISING THE SES: A COLLABORATIVE PROCESS TO IMPROVE ASSESSMENT OF SEXUAL AGGRESSION AND VICTIMIZATION

Authors

Errata

This article is corrected by:

  1. Errata: ERRATUM Volume 32, Issue 4, 493, Article first published online: 11 November 2008

  • Mary P. Koss, Division of Health Promotion Sciences, University of Arizona; Antonia Abbey, Department of Psychology, Wayne State University; Rebecca Campbell, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University; Sarah Cook, Department of Psychology, Georgia State University; Jeanette Norris, Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, University of Washington; Maria Testa, Research Institute on Addictions, University of Buffalo; Sarah Ullman, Department of Criminal Justice, University of Illinois at Chicago; Carolyn West, Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, University of Washington at Tacoma; Jacquelyn White, Department of Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Mary P. Koss, Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, 1632 E. Lester Street, Tucson, AZ 85719. E-mail: mpk@u.arizona.edu

Abstract

The Sexual Experiences Survey (SES) assesses victimization and perpetration of unwanted sexual experiences (e.g., Koss, Gidycz, & Wisniewski, 1987). Revised versions of the SES that resulted from the work of the SES Collaboration are now available. This article reviews weaknesses of the SES that were identified, strengths that were preserved, and methodological considerations in the measurement of unwanted sexual experiences that informed the revisions. The primary changes include: more behavioral specificity; conversion to gender neutrality; full crossing of unwanted acts and coercive tactics; and revised and updated wording for assessing consent, alcohol-related incidents, unwanted acts, and coercive tactics. For illustration, the full text of the revised victimization version and its scoring rules are provided. The article concludes with suggestions for future research. These suggestions aim to involve researchers in a coordinated agenda to develop data that clarify methodological questions and contribute to continued improvement in assessing sexual victimization and perpetration.

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