SOCIAL DOMINANCE ORIENTATION, RIGHT-WING AUTHORITARIANISM, SEXISM, AND PREJUDICE TOWARD WOMEN IN THE WORKFORCE

Authors


  • Andrew N. Christopher and Mark R. Wojda, Department of Psychology, Albion College.

  • This work was supported by a grant to the first author from the Hewlett-Mellon Fund for Faculty Development at Albion College and by a grant to the second author from the Foundation for Undergraduate Research, Scholarship, and Creative Activity at Albion College.

  • Kristen Abraham, Jessica Hauser, Pam Marek, and Mark Walter provided valuable feedback on previous drafts of this article.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Andrew N. Christopher, Department of Psychology, Albion College, 611 E. Porter Street, Albion, MI 49224. E-mail: achristopher@albion.edu

Abstract

This study examined how social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) were related to two different forms of prejudice against working women: employment skepticism and traditional role preference. Three hundred forty-nine American adults completed measures of SDO, RWA, employment skepticism, traditional role preference, hostile sexism, and benevolent sexism. Multiple regression analyses revealed that SDO accounted for significant variability in both employment skepticism and traditional role preference, and that RWA accounted for significant variability in traditional role preference. Mediational analyses suggested that hostile sexism attenuated the relationship between SDO and employment skepticism, and benevolent sexism attenuated the relationship between RWA and traditional role preference. Results are discussed with respect to different forms of prejudice against working women and how each one might be rooted in different ideological preferences.

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