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MORE THAN NUMBERS: INDIVIDUAL AND CONTEXTUAL FACTORS IN HOW GENDER DIVERSITY AFFECTS WOMEN'S WELL-BEING

Authors


  • Kathi Miner-Rubino, Department of Psychology, Women's and Gender Studies Program, Texas A&M University; Isis H. Settles, Department of Psychology, Michigan State University; Abigail J. Stewart, Department of Psychology, Women's Studies Program, University of Michigan.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Kathi Miner-Rubino, 12 Legett Hall, TAMU 4355, College Station, TX 77843-4355. E-mail: kminer-rubino@tamu.edu

Abstract

This study examined factors related to workplace gender diversity in a sample of 87 college-educated White women. Specifically, we investigated the moderating effects of one individual difference variable (sensitivity to sexism) and one contextual variable (perceptions of the workplace climate) in the relationship between the gender composition at the hierarchical level above the woman and her well-being (job satisfaction and general health). Results indicated that more negative well-being was associated with having more women working at the level above when women worked in a perceived negative climate whereas more positive well-being was associated with having more women working at the level above when women worked in a perceived positive climate. For general health, these findings were stronger for women who were also sensitive to sexism. Implications for research on gender diversity in work organizations are discussed.

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