GENDER DIFFERENCES IN PAY EXPECTATIONS: THE ROLES OF JOB INTENTION AND SELF-VIEW

Authors


  • Mary Hogue and Cathy L. Z. DuBois, Management and Information Systems Department, Kent State University; Lee Fox-Cardamone, Department of Psychology, Kent State University.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to: Mary Hogue, Management and Information Systems Department, Kent State University, Kent, OH 44240. E-mail: mhogue@kent.edu

Abstract

Because pay expectations play a role in the persistent gender pay gap, we surveyed 435 undergraduate students to examine the impacts of gender, job intentions, and self-views on the pay expectations of pre-career women and men. Our findings showed a gender gap in which women expected to be paid less than men expected to be paid at the beginning and at the peak of their careers. Findings also showed a gap in job intentions such that women and men who intended to hold female-dominated jobs expected to be paid less than those pursuing male-dominated jobs at both time periods. Further exploration showed that job intentions fully mediated the link between gender and entry-level pay expectations but did not mediate the link between gender and peak-career pay expectancies. After controlling for the gender type of the intended job, self-esteem did not moderate the relationship between gender and pay expectations at either career point, but self-efficacy did at both points. Increased self-efficacy raised the entry-level pay expectations of women and reduced the peak-career pay expectations of men. Our results highlight the importance of encouraging cross-stereotypic job pursuits for both women and men and indicate the importance of self-efficacy in curbing the gap in pay expectations.

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