Get access

Exploring person-centredness: a qualitative meta-synthesis of four studies

Authors

  • Brendan McCormack DPhil (Oxon.), BSc (Hons.) Nursing, PGCEA, RNT, RGN, RMN (Professor of Nursing Research, Adjunct Professor of Nursing, Adjunct Professor of Nursing),

    1. Head, Person Centred Practice Research Centre, Institute of Nursing Research/School of Nursing, University of Ulster, Co Antrim, UK
    2. Monash University, Vic., Australia
    3. UTS, Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bengt Karlsson RN, PhD (Professor of Mental Health Care),

    1. Department of Health Sciences, Buskerud University College, Drammen, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jan Dewing RN, MSc, PhD (Professor, Honorary Research Fellow, Visiting Professor),

    1. Person-centred Research and Practice Development, Canterbury Christchurch University Kent/East Sussex Community Health NHS England, Canterbury, UK
    2. School of Nursing, University of Ulster, Co. Antrim, UK
    3. University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Anners Lerdal RN, PhD (Professor of Nursing)

    1. Lovisenberg Deaconal University College, Oslo
    2. Research Centre, University Hospital Trust, Aker, Drammen, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author

Brendan McCormack, Institute of Nursing Research/School of Nursing, University of Ulster, Shore Road, Newtownabbey, Co Antrim BT37 0QB, UK.
E-mail: bg.mccormack@ulster.ac.uk

Abstract

Scand J Caring Sci; 2010; 24; 620–634
Exploring person-centredness: a qualitative meta-synthesis of four studies

Person-centredness as a concept is becoming more prominent and increasingly central within some research literature, approaches to practice and as a guiding principle within some health and social care policy. Despite the increasing body of literature into person-centred nursing (PCN), there continues to be a ‘siloed’ approach to its study, with few studies integrating perspectives from across nursing specialties. The purpose of this paper is to present the results of a study undertaken to explore if the secondary analysis of findings from four different and unrelated research studies (that did not have the main aim of researching person-centredness) could inform our understanding of person-centred nursing. A qualitative meta-synthesis was undertaken of the data derived from the four unrelated research studies undertaken with different client groups with long-term health conditions. A hermeneutic and interpretative approach was used to guide the analysis of data and framed within a particular person-centred nursing framework. Findings suggest ‘professional competence’ (where competence is understood more broadly than technical competence) and knowing ‘self’ are important prerequisites for person-centred nursing. Characteristics of the care environment were also found to be critical. Despite the existence of expressed person-centred values, care processes largely remained routinised, ritualistic and affording few opportunities for the formation of meaningful relationships. Person-centred nursing needs to be understood in a broader context than the immediate nurse–patient/family relationship. The person-centred nursing framework has utility in helping to understand the dynamics of the components of person-centredness and overcoming the siloed nature of many current perspectives.

Get access to the full text of this article

Ancillary