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Microsatellites isolated from diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), for studies of dispersal in Australian populations

Authors

  • N. M. ENDERSBY,

    Corresponding author
    1. Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University VIC 3800, Australia
    2. Department of Primary Industries, Knoxfield, Private Bag 15 Ferntree Gully Delivery Centre VIC 3156, Australia
    3. Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research, La Trobe University VIC 3086, Australia
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  • S. W. MCKECHNIE,

    1. Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research, School of Biological Sciences, Monash University VIC 3800, Australia
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  • H. VOGEL,

    1. Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, Department of Genetics and Evolution, Beutenberg Campus, Hans-Knöll-Str. 8, 07745 Jena, Germany
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  • L. J. GAHAN,

    1. Department of Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson SC 29634, USA
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  • S. W. BAXTER,

    1. Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research, Department of Genetics, University of Melbourne, Parkville VIC 3010, Australia
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  • P. M. RIDLAND,

    1. Department of Primary Industries, Knoxfield, Private Bag 15 Ferntree Gully Delivery Centre VIC 3156, Australia
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  • A. R. WEEKS

    1. Centre for Environmental Stress and Adaptation Research, La Trobe University VIC 3086, Australia
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Nancy Endersby. Fax: + 61 3 9905 5613; E-mail: Nancy.Endersby@sci.monash.edu.au

Abstract

Diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is a worldwide agricultural pest that has developed resistance to many insecticides used for its control. Population structure and gene flow are yet to be determined for P. xylostella in Australia, but are important factors for the design of effective control strategies. We have isolated six polymorphic microsatellite markers: three from a partial genomic library, two from an Expressed Sequence Tagged library and one from an aminopeptidase intron of P. xylostella. These microsatellites will be used to determine population structure and gene flow in Australian populations of P. xylostella to improve insecticide resistance management.

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