Development of 10 polymorphic microsatellite markers from herbicide-bleached tissues of the brooding pocilloporid coral Seriatopora hystrix

Authors

  • J. N. UNDERWOOD,

    1. School of Animal Biology, University of Western Australia, Nedlands, Western Australia 6009, Australia,
    2. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Queensland, 4810, Australia,
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  • P. B. SOUTER,

    1. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Queensland, 4810, Australia,
    2. School of Life Sciences, Södertörn University College, 14189 Huddinge, Sweden,
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  • E. R. BALLMENT,

    1. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Queensland, 4810, Australia,
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  • A. H. LUTZ,

    1. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Queensland, 4810, Australia,
    2. Institute of Zoology, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel, Switzerland
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  • M. J. H. VAN OPPEN

    1. Australian Institute of Marine Science, PMB 3, Townsville Mail Centre, Queensland, 4810, Australia,
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Madeleine van Oppen, Fax: 7-47725852; E-mail: m.vanoppen@aims.gov.au

Abstract

Here we report the isolation of 44 microsatellites from the brooding, pocilloporid coral, Seriatopora hystrix, developed from a partial genomic DNA library using a repeat enrichment protocol. A further eight previously published microsatellites were also tested; five of these were developed for S. hystrix, whereas three were isolated from corals of the closely related genus Pocillopora. Out of these, we incorporated nine and 10 primer pairs into two multiplex reactions that reliably amplified polymorphic microsatellites in populations from the west and the east coast of Australia, respectively. Number of alleles ranged from three to 22 per locus.

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