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EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES AND DEVELOPING COUNTRIES: STEM CELL RESEARCH REGULATION AND ARGENTINA

Authors


Shawn H.E. Harmon, University of Edinburgh, Old College, South Bridge, Edinburgh, EH8 9YL, United Kingdom. shawn.harmon@ed.ac.uk

ABSTRACT

Given its intimate relationship with the human body and its environment, biotechnology innovation, and more particularly stem cell research innovations as a part thereof, implicate diverse social and moral/ethical issues. This paper explores some of the most important and controversial moral concerns raised by human embryonic stem cell research (and the closely associated field of cloning), focusing on concerns relating to the wellbeing of the embryo and the wellbeing of society (the collective). It then considers how and whether these concerns are dealt with in regulatory instruments in Argentina, a southern developing country, examining in particular whether the values underlying these concerns have been translated into practical and effective rules reflective of the primary moral positions advanced. It concludes that Argentina's current state of stem cell research governance fails to consistently reflect the moral positions that have formed and is inadequate given Argentina's activity in this field.

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