Research Integrity in Greater China: Surveying Regulations, Perceptions and Knowledge of Research Integrity from a Hong Kong Perspective

Authors

  • Sara R. Jordan,

  • Phillip W. Gray


  • Conflict of interest statement: No conflicts declared

Address for correspondence: Sara R. Jordan, Assistant Professor, University of Hong Kong, Department of Politics & Public Administration and The Graduate School, The Jockey Club Building, Social Sciences c-950 Pokufulam Road, Hong Kong, HKSAR, People's Republic of China. Email: sjordan@hku.hk.

Abstract

In their 2010 article ‘Research Integrity in China: Problems and Prospects’, Zeng and Resnik challenge others to engage in empirical research on research integrity in China. Here we respond to that call in three ways: first, we provide updates to their analysis of regulations and allegations of scientific misconduct; second, we report on two surveys conducted in Hong Kong that provide empirical backing to describe ways in which problems and prospects that Zeng and Resnik identify are being explored; and third, we continue the discussion started by Zeng and Resnik, pointing to ways in which China's high-profile participation in international academic research presents concerns about research integrity. According to our research, based upon searches of both English and Chinese language literature and policies, and two surveys conducted in Hong Kong, academic faculty and research post-graduate students in Hong Kong are aware of and have a positive attitude towards responsible conduct of research. Although Hong Kong is but one small part of China, we present this research as a response to concerns Zeng and Resnik introduce and as a call for a continued conversation.

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