SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

References

  • Ackerly, D.D., Knight, C.A., Weiss, S.B., Barton, K. & Starnemer, K.P. (2002) Leaf size, specific leaf area and microhabitat distribution of chaparral woody plants: contrasting patterns in species level and community analysis. Oecologia, 130, 449457.
  • Alpert, P., Bone, E. & Holzapfel, C. (2000) Invasiveness, invasibility and the role of environmental stress in the spread of non-native plants. Perspectives in Plant Ecology, Evolution and Systematics, 3, 5266.
  • Baker, H.G. (1965) Characteristics and modes of origin of weeds. The genetics of colonizing species (ed. by H.G.Baker and G.L.Stebbins), pp. 147172, Academic Press, New York.
  • Belmonte, J. & Vilà, M. (2004) Atmospheric invasion of non-native pollen in the Mediterranean region. American Journal of Botany, 91, 12431250.
  • Booth, B.D., Murphy, S.D. & Swanton, C.J. (2003) Weed ecology in natural and agricultural systems. CABI, Wallingford.
  • Breton, C., Guerin, J., Ducatillion, C., Medail, F., Kull, C.A. & Berville, A. (2008) Taming the wild and ‘wilding’ the tame: Tree breeding and dispersal in Australia and the Mediterranean. Plant Science, 175, 197205.
  • Burke, M.J.W. & Grime, J.P. (1996) An experimental study of plant community invasibility. Ecology, 77, 776790.
  • Burnham, K.P. & Anderson, D.R. (2002) Model selection and multimodel inference. Springer, New York.
  • Burns, J.H. (2004) A comparison of invasive and non-invasive dayflowers (Commelinaceae) across experimental nutrient and water gradients. Diversity and Distributions, 10, 387397.
  • Cadotte, M.W. & Lovett-Doust, J. (2001) Ecological and taxonomic differences between native and introduced plants of southwestern Ontario. Ecoscience, 8, 230238.
  • Cadotte, M.W., Murray, B.R. & Lovett-Doust, J. (2006a) Ecological patterns and biological invasions: using regional species inventories in macroecology. Biological Invasions, 8, 809821.
  • Cadotte, M.W., Murray, B.R. & Lovett-Doust, J. (2006b) Evolutionary and ecological influences of plant invader success in the flora of Ontario. Ecoscience, 13, 388395.
  • Celesti-Grapow, L., Di Marzio, P. & Blasi, C. (2003) Temporal niche separation of the alien flora of Rome. Plant invasions: ecological threats and management solutions (ed. by Child, L., Brock, J.H., Brundu, G., Prach, K., Pys̆ek, P., Wade, P.M. & Williamson, M.), pp. 101111, Backhuys, Leiden.
  • Crawley, M.J., Harvey, P.H. & Purvis, A. (1996) Comparative ecology of the native and alien floras of the British Isles. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London B, 351, 12511259.
  • Daehler, C.C. (2003) Performance comparisons of co-occurring native and alien invasive plants: implications for conservation and restoration. Annual Review of Ecology Evolution and Systematics, 34, 183211.
  • Dawson, W., Burslem, D. & Hulme, P.E. (2009) Factors explaining alien plant invasion success in a tropical ecosystem differ at each stage of invasion. Journal of Ecology, 97, 657665.
  • Floret, C., Galan, M.J., LeFloc’h, E., Orshan, E. & Romane, F. (1990) Growth forms and phenomorphology traits along an environmental gradient: tools for studying vegetation? Journal of Vegetation Science, 1, 7180.
  • Gibson, M., Richardson, D.M., Marchante, E., Marchante, H., Rodger, J.G., Stone, G.N., Byrne, M., Fuentes-Ramírez, A., George, N., Harris, C., Johnson, S.D., Le Roux, J.J., Murphy, D.J., Pauw, A., Prescott, M.N., Wandrag, E.M. & Wilson, J.R.U. (2011) Reproductive biology of Australian acacias: fundamental mediator of invasive success? Diversity and Distributions, 17, 911933.
  • Godoy, O., Castro-Díez, P., Valladares, F. & Costa-Tenorio, M. (2009a) Different flowering phenology of alien invasive species in Spain: evidence for the use of an empty temporal niche? Plant Biology, 11, 803811.
  • Godoy, O., Richardson, D.M., Valladares, F. & Castro-Díez, P. (2009b) Flowering phenology of invasive alien plant species compared with native species in three Mediterranean-type ecosystems. Annals of Botany, 103, 485494.
  • Goodwin, B.J., McAllister, A.J. & Fahrig, L. (1999) Predicting invasiveness of plant species based on biological information. Conservation Biology, 13, 422426.
  • Grime, J.P. (1977) Evidence for the existence of three primary strategies in plants and its relevance to ecological and evolutionary theory. American Naturalist, 111, 11691194.
  • Grime, J.P. (1988) The CRS model of primary plant strategies: origins, implications, and tests. Plant evolutionary biology (ed. by L.D.Gottlieb and S.K.Jain), pp. 371393, Chapman and Hall, London.
  • Grotkopp, E. & Rejmánek, M. (2007) High seedling relative growth rate and specific leaf area are traits of invasive species: phylogenetically independent contrasts of woody angiosperms. American Journal of Botany, 94, 526532.
  • Grotkopp, E., Rejmánek, M. & Rost, T.L. (2002) Toward a causal explanation of plant invasiveness: seedling growth and life-history strategies of 29 pine (Pinus) species. American Naturalist, 159, 396419.
  • Hamilton, M.A., Murray, B.R., Cadotte, M.W., Hose, G.C., Baker, A.C., Harris, C.J. & Licari, D. (2005) Life-history correlates of plant invasiveness at regional and continental scales. Ecology Letters, 8, 10661074.
  • Higgins, S.I. & Richardson, D.M. (1999) Predicting plant migration rates in a changing world: the role of long-distance dispersal. American Naturalist, 153, 464475.
  • Hijmans, R.J., Cameron, S., Parra, J., Jones, P., Jarvis, A. & Richardson, K. (2009) WorldClim. Global climate data. Versión 1.4 (release 3). http://www.worldclim.org/ (accessed July 2008).
  • Hulme, P.E. (2006) Beyond control: wider implications for the management of biological invasions. Journal of Applied Ecology, 43, 835847.
  • Inderjit, Seastedt, T.R., Callaway, R.M., Pollock, J.L. & Kaur, J. (2008) Allelopathy and plant invasions: traditional, congeneric, and bio-geographical approaches. Biological Invasions, 10, 875890.
  • Lake, J.C. & Leishman, M.R. (2004) Invasion success of exotic plants in natural ecosystems: the role of disturbance, plant attributes and freedom from herbivores. Biological Conservation, 117, 215226.
  • Le Maitre, D.C., Sheppard, A.W., Marchante, E., Holmes, P., Gaertner, M., Rogers, A., Pauchard, A., Ens, E.J., González Rodríguez, L. & Richardson, D.M. (2011) Impacts of Australian acacias: implications for management and restoration. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 10151029.
  • Leishman, M.R., Haslehurst, T., Ares, A. & Baruch, Z. (2007) Leaf trait relationships of native and invasive plants: community- and global-scale comparisons. New Phytologist, 176, 635643.
  • Lloret, F., Médail, F., Brundu, G., Camarda, I., Moragues, E., Rita, J., Lambdon, P. & Hulme, P.E. (2005) Species attributes and invasion success by alien plants on Mediterranean islands. Journal of Ecology, 93, 512520.
  • Mack, R.N. (2003) Phylogenetic constraint, absent life forms, and preadapted alien plants: a prescription for biological invasions. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 164, S183S196.
  • Miller, J.P., Murphy, D.J., Brown, G.K., Richardson, D.M. & González-Orozco, C.E. (2011) The evolution and phylogenetic placement of invasive Australian Acacia species. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 848860.
  • Mooney, H.A., Ferrar, P.J. & Slatyer, R.O. (1978) Photosynthetic capacity and carbon allocation patterns in diverse growth forms of Eucalyptus. Oecologia, 36, 103111.
  • Niinemets, Ü. & Kull, K. (1994) Leaf weight per area and leaf size of 85 Estonian woody species in relation to shade tolerance and light availability. Forest Ecology and Management, 70, 110.
  • Olden, J.D. & Rooney, T.P. (2006) On defining and quantifying biotic homogenization. Global Ecology and Biogeography Letters, 15, 113120.
  • Pyšek, P. & Richardson, D.M. (2007) Traits associated with invasiveness in alien plants: where do we stand? Biological invasions (ed. by W.Nentwig), pp. 97125. Springer-Verlag, Berlin Heidelberg.
  • Pyšek, P., Sadlo, J., Mandak, B. & Jarošík, V. (2003) Czech alien flora and the historical pattern of its formation: what came first to Central Europe? Oecologia, 135, 122130.
  • Pyšek, P., Richardson, D.M. & Williamson, M. (2004a) Predicting and explaining plant invasions through analysis of source area floras: some critical considerations. Diversity and Distributions, 10, 179187.
  • Pyšek, P., Richardson, D.M., Rejmánek, M., Webster, G., Williamson, M. & Kirschner, J. (2004b) Alien plants in checklists and floras: towards better communication between taxonomists and ecologists. Taxon, 53, 131143.
  • Pyšek, P., Jarošík, V., Pergl, J., Randall, R., Chytrý, M., Kühn, I., Tichý, L., Danihelka, J., Chrtek, J.J. & Sádlo, J. (2009) The global invasion success of Central European plants is related to distribution characteristics in their native range and species traits. Diversity and Distributions, 15, 891903.
  • Rejmánek, M. (1996) A theory of seed plant invasiveness: the first sketch. Biological Conservation, 78, 171181.
  • Rejmánek, M. & Richardson, D.M. (1996) What attributes make some plant species more invasive? Ecology, 77, 16551661.
  • Richardson, D.M. (2006) Pinus: a model group for unlocking the secrets of alien plant invasions? Preslia, 78, 375388.
  • Richardson, D.M. & Kluge, R.L. (2008) Seed banks of invasive Australian Acacia species in South Africa: Role in invasiveness and options for management. Perspectives in Plant Ecology Evolution and Systematics, 10, 161177.
  • Richardson, D.M. & Pyšek, P. (2006) Plant invasions: merging the concepts of species invasiveness and community invasibility. Progress in Physical Geography, 30, 409431.
  • Richardson, D.M. & Rejmánek, M. (2011) Trees and shrubs as invasive alien species – a global review. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 788809.
  • Richardson, D.M., Carruthers, J., Hui, C., Impson, F.A.C., Miller, J.T., Robertson, M.P., Rouget, M., Le Roux, J.J. & Wilson, J.R.U. (2011) Human-mediated introductions of Australian acacias—a global experiment in biogeography. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 771787.
  • Simberloff, D. (2009) We can eliminate invasions or live with them. Successful management projects. Biological Invasions, 11, 149157.
  • Thuiller, W., Richardson, D.M., Rouget, M., Procheş, S. & Wilson, J.R.U. (2006) Interactions between environment, species traits, and human uses describe patterns of plant invasions. Ecology, 87, 17551769.
  • Van Kleunen, M. & Johnson, S.D. (2007) South African Iridaceae with rapid and profuse seedling emergence are more likely to become naturalized in other regions. Journal of Ecology, 95, 674681.
  • Van Kleunen, M., Johnson, S.D. & Fischer, M. (2007) Predicting naturalization of Southern African Iridaceae in other regions. Journal of Applied Ecology, 44, 594603.
  • Van Kleunen, M., Weber, E. & Fischer, M. (2010) A meta-analysis of trait differences between invasive and non-invasive plant species. Ecology Letters, 13, 235245.
  • Vilà, M., Basnou, C., Pyšek, P. et al. (2010) How well do we understand the impacts of alien species on ecosystem services? A pan-European, cross-taxa assessment. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 8, 135144.
  • Vitousek, P.M. & Walker, L.R. (1989) Biological invasion by Myrica faya in Hawai’i: plant demography, nutrient fixation, ecosystem effects. Ecological Monographs, 59, 247265.
  • Weber, E. (2003) Invasive species of the world: A reference guide to environmental weeds. CABI Publishing, Oxford, UK.
  • Werger, M.J.A. & Ellenbroek, G.A. (1978) Leaf size and leaf consistence of a riverine forest formation along a climatic gradient. Oecologia, 34, 297308.
  • Williamson, M. & Fitter, A. (1996) The characters of successful invaders. Biological Conservation, 78, 163170.
  • Wilson, J.R.U., Richardson, D.M., Rouget, M., Procheş, S., Amis, M.A., Henderson, L. & Thuiller, W. (2007) Residence time and potential range: crucial considerations in modelling plant invasions. Diversity and Distributions, 13, 1122.
  • Wilson, J.R.U., Gairifo, C., Gibson, M.R. et al. (2011) Risk assessment, eradication, and biological control: global efforts to limit Australian acacia invasions. Diversity and Distributions, 17, 10301046.
  • Zheng, Y.L., Feng, Y.L., Liu, W.X. & Liao, Z.Y. (2009) Growth, biomass allocation, morphology, and photosynthesis of invasive Eupatorium adenophorum and its native congeners grown at four irradiances. Plant Ecology, 203, 263271.