SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION

Cited in:

CrossRef

This article has been cited by:

  1. 1
    Genevieve D. Thompson, Dirk U. Bellstedt, David M. Richardson, John R. U. Wilson, Johannes J. Le Roux, A tree well travelled: global genetic structure of the invasive tree Acacia saligna, Journal of Biogeography, 2015, 42, 2
  2. 2
    David M Richardson, Johannes J Le Roux, John RU Wilson, Australian acacias as invasive species: lessons to be learnt from regions with long planting histories, Southern Forests: a Journal of Forest Science, 2015, 1

    CrossRef

  3. 3
    Patrícia Fernandes, Cristina Antunes, Otília Correia, Cristina Máguas, Do climatic and habitat conditions affect the reproductive success of an invasive tree species? An assessment of the phenology of Acacia longifolia in Portugal, Plant Ecology, 2015, 216, 2, 343

    CrossRef

  4. 4
    E. M. Wandrag, A. W. Sheppard, R. P. Duncan, P. E. Hulme, Pollinators and predators at home and away: do they determine invasion success for Australian Acacia in New Zealand?, Journal of Biogeography, 2015, 42, 3
  5. 5
    R. V. GALLAGHER, R. P. RANDALL, M. R. LEISHMAN, Trait Differences between Naturalized and Invasive Plant Species Independent of Residence Time and Phylogeny, Conservation Biology, 2015, 29, 1
  6. 6
    Francesca Meloni, Caterina Angela Dettori, Francesco Mascia, Lina Podda, Gianluigi Bacchetta, What does the germination ecophysiology of the invasiveAcacia saligna(Labill.) Wendl. (Fabaceae) teach us for its management?, Plant Biosystems - An International Journal Dealing with all Aspects of Plant Biology, 2015, 149, 2, 242

    CrossRef

  7. 7
    Tricia Wevill, Singarayer K. Florentine, An assessment of riparian restoration outcomes in two rural catchments in south-western Victoria: Focusing on tree and shrub species richness, structure and recruitment characteristics, Ecological Management & Restoration, 2014, 15, 2
  8. 8
    Karen D. Lediuk, María A. Damascos, Javier G. Puntieri, Maya Svriz, Differences in phenology and fruit characteristic between invasive and native woody species favor exotic species invasiveness, Plant Ecology, 2014, 215, 12, 1455

    CrossRef

  9. 9
    Haylee Kaplan, Adriaan van Niekerk, Johannes J. Le Roux, David M. Richardson, John R. U. Wilson, Incorporating risk mapping at multiple spatial scales into eradication management plans, Biological Invasions, 2014, 16, 3, 691

    CrossRef

  10. 10
    A Fabião, C Faria, MH Almeida, A Fabião, Influence of mother plant and scarification agents on seed germination rate and vigor in Retama sphaerocarpa L. (Boissier), iForest - Biogeosciences and Forestry, 2014, 7, 5, 306

    CrossRef

  11. 11
    Agnaldo Aguiar, Reinaldo I. Barbosa, José B.F. Barbosa, Moisés Mourão, Invasion ofAcacia mangiumin Amazonian savannas following planting for forestry, Plant Ecology & Diversity, 2014, 7, 1-2, 359

    CrossRef

  12. 12
    Jason E. Donaldson, Cang Hui, David M. Richardson, Mark P. Robertson, Bruce L. Webber, John R.U. Wilson, Invasion trajectory of alien trees: the role of introduction pathway and planting history, Global Change Biology, 2014, 20, 5
  13. 13
    P. Norman, R. Denham, M. J. Calvert, Life histories of two arid-zone shrubs change with differences in habitat, grazing and climate, The Rangeland Journal, 2014, 36, 3, 249

    CrossRef

  14. 14
    Cang Hui, David M. Richardson, Vernon Visser, John R. U. Wilson, Macroecology meets invasion ecology: performance of Australian acacias and eucalypts around the world revealed by features of their native ranges, Biological Invasions, 2014, 16, 3, 565

    CrossRef

  15. 15
    Eleanor K. O’Brien, Andrew J. Denham, David J. Ayre, Patterns of genotypic diversity suggest a long history of clonality and population isolation in the Australian arid zone shrub Acacia carneorum, Plant Ecology, 2014, 215, 1, 55

    CrossRef

  16. 16
    Johannes J. Le Roux, Dominique Strasberg, Mathieu Rouget, Clifford W. Morden, Megan Koordom, David M. Richardson, Relatedness defies biogeography: the tale of two island endemics (Acacia heterophylla and A. koa), New Phytologist, 2014, 204, 1
  17. 17
    Marta Correia, Sílvia Castro, Victoria Ferrero, João A. Crisóstomo, Susana Rodríguez-Echeverría, Reproductive biology and success of invasive Australian acacias in Portugal, Botanical Journal of the Linnean Society, 2014, 174, 4
  18. 18
    Annette M. Muir, Peter A. Vesk, Graham Hepworth, Reproductive trajectories over decadal time-spans after fire for eight obligate-seeder shrub species in south-eastern Australia, Australian Journal of Botany, 2014, 62, 5, 369

    CrossRef

  19. 19
    Jason E. Donaldson, David M. Richardson, John R. U. Wilson, Scale-area curves: a tool for understanding the ecology and distribution of invasive tree species, Biological Invasions, 2014, 16, 3, 553

    CrossRef

  20. 20
    Petr Pyšek, Vojtěch Jarošík, Jan Pergl, Lenka Moravcová, Milan Chytrý, Ingolf Kühn, Temperate trees and shrubs as global invaders: the relationship between invasiveness and native distribution depends on biological traits, Biological Invasions, 2014, 16, 3, 577

    CrossRef

  21. 21
    J.E. Donaldson, D.M. Richardson, J.R.U. Wilson, The seed ecology of an ornamental wattle in South Africa — Why has Acacia elata not invaded a greater area?, South African Journal of Botany, 2014, 94, 40

    CrossRef

  22. 22
    C. Giuliani, M. Giovanetti, B. Foggi, M. Mariotti Lippi, Two alien invasive acacias in Italy: Differences and similarities in their flowering and insect visitors, Plant Biosystems - An International Journal Dealing with all Aspects of Plant Biology, 2014, 1

    CrossRef

  23. 23
    Matthew J. Larcombe, Joaquim S. Silva, René E. Vaillancourt, Brad M. Potts, Assessing the invasive potential of Eucalyptus globulus in Australia: quantification of wildling establishment from plantations, Biological Invasions, 2013, 15, 12, 2763

    CrossRef

  24. 24
    Michelle R. Gibson, Anton Pauw, David M. Richardson, Decreased insect visitation to a native species caused by an invasive tree in the Cape Floristic Region, Biological Conservation, 2013, 157, 196

    CrossRef

  25. 25
    F. Moreira, A. Ferreira, N. Abrantes, F. Catry, P. Fernandes, L. Roxo, J.J. Keizer, J. Silva, Occurrence of native and exotic invasive trees in burned pine and eucalypt plantations: Implications for post-fire forest conversion, Ecological Engineering, 2013, 58, 296

    CrossRef

  26. 26
    H. Ibrahim Erkovan, Peter J. Clarke, Ralph D. B. Whalley, Seed bank dynamics of Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd. and its encroachment potential in sub-humid grasslands of eastern Australia, The Rangeland Journal, 2013, 35, 4, 427

    CrossRef

  27. 27
    James G. Rodger, Steven D. Johnson, Self-pollination and inbreeding depression in Acacia dealbata: Can selfing promote invasion in trees?, South African Journal of Botany, 2013, 88, 252

    CrossRef

  28. 28
    Sabrina Kumschick, David M. Richardson, Species-based risk assessments for biological invasions: advances and challenges, Diversity and Distributions, 2013, 19, 9
  29. 29
    Tim Low, Australian acacias: weeds or useful trees?, Biological Invasions, 2012, 14, 11, 2217

    CrossRef

  30. 30
    Michelle R. Gibson, David M. Richardson, Anton Pauw, Can floral traits predict an invasive plant's impact on native plant–pollinator communities?, Journal of Ecology, 2012, 100, 5
  31. 31
    GENEVIEVE D. THOMPSON, DIRK U. BELLSTEDT, MARGARET BYRNE, MELISSA A. MILLAR, DAVID M. RICHARDSON, JOHN R.U. WILSON, JOHANNES J. LE ROUX, Cultivation shapes genetic novelty in a globally important invader, Molecular Ecology, 2012, 21, 13
  32. 32
    H. Kaplan, H.W.F. Van Zyl, J.J. Le Roux, D.M. Richardson, J.R.U. Wilson, Distribution and management of Acacia implexa (Benth.) in South Africa: A suitable target for eradication?, South African Journal of Botany, 2012, 83, 23

    CrossRef

  33. 33
    N. González-Muñoz, M. Costa-Tenorio, T. Espigares, Invasion of alien Acacia dealbata on Spanish Quercus robur forests: Impact on soils and vegetation, Forest Ecology and Management, 2012, 269, 214

    CrossRef

  34. 34
    Christina Birnbaum, Luke G. Barrett, Peter H. Thrall, Michelle R. Leishman, Mutualisms are not constraining cross-continental invasion success of Acacia species within Australia, Diversity and Distributions, 2012, 18, 10
  35. 35
    Marine Dodet, Catherine Collet, When should exotic forest plantation tree species be considered as an invasive threat and how should we treat them?, Biological Invasions, 2012, 14, 9, 1765

    CrossRef

  36. You have free access to this content36
    Joslin L. Moore, Michael C. Runge, Bruce L. Webber, John R. U. Wilson, Contain or eradicate? Optimizing the management goal for Australian acacia invasions in the face of uncertainty, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  37. You have free access to this content37
    Taryn L. Morris, Karen J. Esler, Nichole N. Barger, Shayne M. Jacobs, Michael D. Cramer, Ecophysiological traits associated with the competitive ability of invasive Australian acacias, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  38. You have free access to this content38
    A. R. Griffin, S. J. Midgley, D. Bush, P. J. Cunningham, A. T. Rinaudo, Global uses of Australian acacias – recent trends and future prospects, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  39. You have free access to this content39
    David M. Richardson, Jane Carruthers, Cang Hui, Fiona A. C. Impson, Joseph T. Miller, Mark P. Robertson, Mathieu Rouget, Johannes J. Le Roux, John R. U. Wilson, Human-mediated introductions of Australian acacias – a global experiment in biogeography, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  40. You have free access to this content40
    Susana Rodríguez-Echeverría, Johannes J. Le Roux, João A. Crisóstomo, Joice Ndlovu, Jack-of-all-trades and master of many? How does associated rhizobial diversity influence the colonization success of Australian Acacia species?, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  41. You have free access to this content41
    Cang Hui, David M. Richardson, Mark P. Robertson, John R. U. Wilson, Colin J. Yates, Macroecology meets invasion ecology: linking the native distributions of Australian acacias to invasiveness, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  42. You have free access to this content42
    Pilar Castro-Díez, Oscar Godoy, Asunción Saldaña, David M. Richardson, Predicting invasiveness of Australian acacias on the basis of their native climatic affinities, life history traits and human use, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  43. You have free access to this content43
    John R. U. Wilson, Carla Gairifo, Michelle R. Gibson, Margarita Arianoutsou, Baki B. Bakar, Stéphane Baret, Laura Celesti-Grapow, Joseph M. DiTomaso, Jean-Marc Dufour-Dror, Christoph Kueffer, Christian A. Kull, John H. Hoffmann, Fiona A. C. Impson, Lloyd L. Loope, Elizabete Marchante, Hélia Marchante, Joslin L. Moore, Daniel J. Murphy, Jacques Tassin, Arne Witt, Rafael D. Zenni, David M. Richardson, Risk assessment, eradication, and biological control: global efforts to limit Australian acacia invasions, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  44. You have free access to this content44
    Joseph T. Miller, Daniel J. Murphy, Gillian K. Brown, David M. Richardson, Carlos E. González-Orozco, The evolution and phylogenetic placement of invasive Australian Acacia species, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5
  45. You have free access to this content45
    David M. Richardson, Marcel Rejmánek, Trees and shrubs as invasive alien species – a global review, Diversity and Distributions, 2011, 17, 5