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    Shane C. Lishawa, Beth A. Lawrence, Dennis A. Albert, Nancy C. Tuchman, Biomass harvest of invasive Typha promotes plant diversity in a Great Lakes coastal wetland, Restoration Ecology, 2015, 23, 3
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