The song of the Seychelles Warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis, an island endemic

Authors

  • CLIVE K. CATCHPOLE,

    1. Department of Biology, Royal Holloway & Bedford New College, University of London, Egham, Surrey TW20 OEX, UK
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  • JAN KOMDEUR

    1. Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK
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    • *Ministry of the Environment, National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Wildlife Ecology, Kale, Grenavej 12, DK–8410 Ronde, Denmark.


Abstract

The Seychelles Warbler Acrocephalus sechellensis is a resident, cooperative breeder in a saturated, island environment, whose song structure diners significantly from European marshland Acrocephalus species. The song is transmitted within a more restricted frequency range, that which propagates most effectively through tropical forest. The Seychelles Warbler has developed a relatively short, simple song, used for territorial defence throughout the year, which is readily elicited by playback. Yet it also has a complex repertoire of song types, and song activity peaks before and declines during breeding, suggesting a sexual function. The demands of tropical island life are thus reflected in both the structure and function of song in the Seychelles Warbler.

Ancillary