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This report covers the period November 2007 to September 2008. The 36th Report appeared in Ibis 150: 218–220.

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

The BOU website is continually updated and contains the British List, press releases and the most recent Committee and taxonomic reports. The website is for information purposes only and is not an official document or part of the permanent record. Announcements of changes to the British List do not come into effect until published in Ibis.

Taxonomy

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

The 36th Report did not exhaustively reiterate all the recommendations relating to the British List made by the BOURC Taxonomic Sub-Committee (TSC) in its 4th Report (Sangster et al. 2007. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: Fourth report. Ibis 149: 853–857). It is formally noted here that all recommendations therein, with one exception, are adopted with immediate effect. The 36th Report noted the recommendation on the flamingo-grebe clade but, in line with BOURC policy on changes to the sequence of families and higher taxa, agreed to adopt this change in 2010.

Since publication of our last report, the TSC has published its latest recommendations relating to the British List (Knox et al. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: Fifth report. Ibis 150: 833–835). These are adopted with immediate effect and will not be repeated here.

Hooded Merganser Lophodytes cucullatus (Linnaeus)

Add to Category A.

One, immature or female, Oban Trumisgarry, North Uist, Outer Hebrides, from 23 October until 1 November 2000, sight record, photographed (Birding World 13: 506–517).

Monotypic.

Hooded Merganser has an extensive breeding range throughout eastern and the Pacific Northwest of North America. Its primary winter range includes the south-eastern United States for eastern birds and the Pacific coast of USA and Canada for western birds. In addition to records from the Azores, there are three accepted records (of four individuals) from Ireland, and there have been records of apparent vagrants in Iceland and the Canary Islands.

This species was formerly in Category B on the basis of a record from the Menai Straits, Gwynedd, 1830–31, but was moved to Category E following a review in 1999 (Ibis 143: 171–175). In 2001, following assessment of the 2000 Outer Hebrides record, the species was placed in Category D (Ibis 145: 178–183). Since then, an emerging pattern of vagrancy to the Western Palearctic (especially the Azores, where there have been four records since 2001) combined with some evidence of an increase in numbers during Christmas Bird Counts in the USA strengthened the confidence of the Committee that the Outer Hebrides record involved a wild vagrant.

The Committee remains of the opinion, however, that most records in Britain and Europe involve birds of captive origin.

Hooded Merganser should be placed after Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula on the British List as follows:

Hooded Merganser A

Lophodytes cucullatus (Linnaeus)

V monotypic

Grey Partridge Perdix perdix

A change from subspecies recognised (‘intraspecific hybrids as a result of introductions’ and perdix) in the 6th Checklist (BOU 1992) to just perdix (Linnaeus) in the 7th Checklist (BOU 2007) took place without explanation. This change was made to the List as part of the Category C review (Ibis 147: 803–820).

Common Pheasant Phasianus colchicus

A change from subspecies recognised (colchicus, torquatus and ‘other races’) in the 6th Checklist (BOU 1992) to colchicus Linnaeus, torquatus J.F. Gmelin, mongolicus J.F. Brandt, principalis P.L. Sclater, pallasi Rothschild and satscheuensis Pleske in the 7th Checklist (BOU 2007) took place without explanation. This change was made to the List as part of the the Category C review (Ibis 147: 803–820).

Cory's Shearwater Calonectris diomedea

Add subspecies diomedea (Scopoli) to Category A.

One, at sea south of St Mary's (Isles of Scilly), 2 August 2004, sight record, photographed (Birding World 17: 334–336).

Nominate diomedea (‘Scopoli's Shearwater’) breeds on islands in north and west Mediterranean and winters off coasts of Atlantic Ocean (and possibly Indian Ocean).

‘Scopoli's Shearwater’ should be placed on the British List as follows:

Cory's Shearwater A Calonectris diomedea (Scopoli) SM borealis (Cory) V diomedea (Scopoli)

Madeiran Storm-petrel (Band-rumped Storm Petrel) Oceanodroma castro

Delete from Category B and the British List.

The sole British record from Milford, Hampshire, 19 November 1911 was reviewed. The Committee was unable to locate any published description of the bird and, as the specimen was untraceable, its identification was not verified. Furthermore there was no indication whether or not the bird, found dead on the beach, had actually died in British waters.

Great Blue Heron Ardea herodias Linnaeus

Add to Category A.

One, juvenile, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 7 December 2007, sight record, photographed (Birding World 20: 497–502).

Polytypic. Race undetermined.

The Great Blue Heron (herodias group) has a widespread breeding range in North America, from southeast Alaska, northern British Columbia, the central Canadian prairies, southern Ontario, southern Quebec, and the Canadian maritime provinces except Newfoundland, south to Florida, Texas, Baja California, and Central America at least to Belize and Guatemala. Its winter range extends from the Pacific coast south of 61°N through Central America, and mostly south of Canada and midwest United States. It includes the islands and coasts of the Caribbean south to Colombia. Nominate herodias is the most numerous race and part of the eastern population migrates to South America.

There are two previous records of Great Blue Herons which reached British waters after being fed whilst aboard ship: one which was transported to Avonmouth in November 1968 and another which died within 150 miles of the Isles of Scilly in May 1982. Although ship-assisted vagrancy is a complication when considering records of this species, there have now been records from France, the Canary Islands, the Cape Verde Islands, and the Azores (about 23 records) which suggest that unassisted vagrants do reach the Western Palearctic.

There was no reason to believe that the 2007 Scilly bird had been aboard ship, and the prevailing weather conditions (a near-continuous southwesterly airflow across the Atlantic created by two low pressure systems) were considered to support the case for unassisted vagrancy.

Great Blue Heron should be placed after Grey Heron Ardea cinerea on the British List as follows:

Great Blue Heron A Ardea herodias Linnaeus V race undetermined

Wilson's Snipe Gallinago delicata (Ord)

Add to Category A.

One, juvenile, St Mary's, Isles of Scilly, 9 October 1998 to 7 April 1999, sight record, photographed (Birding World 11: 382–385; 12: 56–61).

Until recently treated as conspecific with Common Snipe (Ibis 150: 833–835), Wilson's Snipe has a widespread breeding range across northern North America and easternmost populations are believed to fly across western Atlantic to Central and South America in autumn. Field identification is particularly challenging and relies significantly on precise determinations of pattern, shape and width of outer tail feathers. A re-examination of the specimen from near Bolton, September 1957, held at Bolton Museum confirmed the previous view that it was a Common Snipe G. g. gallinago (Ibis 135: 495).

Wilson's Snipe appears after Common Snipe in the British List as follows:

Wilson's Snipe A Gallinago delicata (Ord) V monotypic

Spotted Sandpiper Actitis macularius

To avoid any doubt arising from the statement in the 35th Report (Ibis 149: 652–654), it is explicitly stated that the record from Whitby, North Yorkshire on 29 March 1849 was reviewed in 2006; the record's association with taxidermist David Graham and the ‘Tadcaster rarities’ (British Birds 98: 230–237) led to its rejection.

Long-tailed Skua Stercorarius longicaudus

Delete race pallescens from the British List.

The race pallescens was admitted to the List on the basis of a specimen from the Sound of Harris, Outer Hebrides, 19 August 1941, now in the Meinertzhagen collection at the NHM (BMNH 1965.M.4109) (Ibis 100: 299–300). A number of British records based on Meinertzhagen specimens were deleted following an earlier review, due to the possibility of fraud (Ibis 135: 320–325, 493–499). At that time Stercorarius longicaudus was considered monotypic and that status was maintained in the 6th (1992) and 7th (2006) Checklists. Following a recent recommendation that Long-tailed Skua should be treated as polytypic with pallescens considered valid (Ibis 146: 153–157), its status on the List was reviewed. The Sound of Harris record was the only occurrence of this race in Britain, and in line with the concern over other Meinertzhagen records it was considered unacceptable.

Great Skua Stercorarius skua

Following further investigations into the identification of the birds from the Isles of Scilly (7 October 2001–22 January 2002) and Glamorgan (1–16 February 2002) the Committee has concluded that both were ‘southern skuas’ of one of the subspecies antarcticus, hamiltoni, lonnbergi or maccormicki. British Birds Rarities Committee (BBRC) is examining the issue further to see if further identification to subspecies is possible. The subspecies antarcticus, hamiltoni and lonnbergi form the ‘Brown Skua’ grouping, and maccormicki is the ‘South Polar Skua’. The TSC is assessing the evidence for species-level splits within or between these groups and nominate birds.

‘Southern Skua’ is listed as part of Great Skua in the British List as follows:

Great Skua A Stercorarius skua (Brünnich) MB PM skua (Brünnich) V race undetermined but of one of the subspecies maccormicki Saunders/antarcticus (Lesson)/hamiltoni (Hagen)/lonnbergi (Mathews).

Iceland Gull Larus glaucoides

The locality for the first record of subspecies kumlieni is corrected to Breck Ness, near Stromness, Orkney (not Shetland) and the correct registration number of the specimen at the NHM is BMNH 1897.11.10.11 (British Birds 93: 278).

Rose-ringed Parakeet Psittacula krameri

A change from subspecies recognised (‘race undetermined’) in the 6th Checklist (BOU 1992) to borealis (Neumann) and manillensis (Bechstein) in the 7th Checklist (BOU 2007) took place without explanation. This change was made to the List as part of the Category C review (Ibis 147: 803–820).

Meadow Pipit Anthus pratensis

Correction to 16th Report: subspecies theresae should be synonymised under whistleri, not nominate pratensis (Ibis 134: 211–214).

Naumann's Thrush Turdus naumanni Temminck

Until recently treated as conspecific with Dusky Thrush (Ibis 150: 833–835).

Naumann's Thrush appears after Dusky Thrush in the British List as follows:

Naumann's Thrush A Turdus naumanni Temminck V monotypic

Black-throated Thrush Turdus atrogularis Jarocki

Until recently treated as conspecific with Red-throated Thrush (as Dark-throated Thrush) (Ibis 150: 833–835).

Red-throated Thrush Turdus ruficollis Pallas

Until recently treated as conspecific with Black-throated Thrush (as Dark-throated Thrush) (Ibis 150: 833–835).

Red-throated Thrush appears after Black-throated Thrush in the British List as follows:

Red-throated Thrush A

Turdus ruficollis Pallas

V monotypic

Green Warbler Phylloscopus nitidus Blyth

Until recently treated as conspecific with Greenish Warbler P. trochiloides (Ibis 150: 833–835).

Green Warbler appears after Sardinian Warbler Sylvia melanocephala in the British List as follows:

Green Warbler A

Phylloscopus nitidus Blyth

V monotypic

Woodchat Shrike Lanius senator badius

Adult male, Sizewell, Suffolk, 15–18 and 21 June 1980, sight record, photographed. This subspecies is already on the British List on the basis of a sight record from Portland, Dorset, 10 May 1986 (Ibis 147: 249). The present record constitutes the first record of this subspecies for Britain.

British List totals

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

With the addition of Hooded Merganser, Great Blue Heron, Wilson's Snipe (now treated as a full species), Naumann's Thrush (now treated as a full species), Red-throated Thrush (now treated as a full species) and Green Warbler (now treated as a full species), and the deletion of Madeiran Petrel, the British List now stands at 583 species. Species in Category D and E form no part of the British List.

CategoryTotal
A564
B  9
C 10
Total583

The following have also been considered:

Consideration of species for elevation to Category C

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

The Committee's 31st Report (Ibis 147: 246–250) gave details of an alert system for Category E species that may warrant elevation to Category C. Following review, this alert system has been removed.

Muscovy Duck Cairina moschata

As part of the Category C review (Ibis 147: 803–820), it was stated that this species now met the criteria for elevation to Category C4. This outcome is suspended to allow further research on the stability and longevity of an isolated, inbreeding population originating from domesticated stock, and to investigate the population's dependency on supplementary feeding.

Bald Eagle Haliaeetus leucocephalus

Retain in Category D.

One record, adult, Llyn Coron, Anglesey, 17 October 1978; although this species is relatively rare in captivity, there were concerns about its age, since adults are less migratory than immatures; the date was also significantly earlier than peak southerly movements of northern birds at Hawk Mountain (Pennsylvania).

Cinereous Vulture Aegypius monachus

Delete from Category D; move to Category E.

One record, adult, mid Wales, 29 November 1977 to 20 February 1978; there were concerns about the age of the bird (as above), and the date of the record since winter is outside the main April-August period of vagrancy in western Europe; the species is known both in captivity and as an escape, and two definite escapes and two considered escapes were at large just across the North Sea during the period August 1974 to April 1978 (British Birds 87: 619).

Collared Pratincole Glareola pratincola

One pair, Yarmouth, Norfolk, November 1810; file circulated as a potential first record. The occurrence was insufficiently documented and the record was unanimously rejected.

Blue Jay Cyanocitta cristata

One, Thornton, Merseyside, 5 June 2003; following consideration, the species was added to Category E.

White-winged Snowfinch Montifringilla nivalis

Delete from Category D; move to Category E.

One record, Lakenheath, Suffolk, June 1969–June 1972 (Figs 1 & 2) the bird was an adult, which arrived for a long stay at a lowland site at a time when this species was known to be in trade on the continent; there have not been any other comparable records in northern Europe.

image

Figure 1 & 2. White-winged Snowfinch Montifringilla nivalis, Lakenheath, Suffolk, June 1969–June 1972. Two previously unpublished photographs from the BOURC archive. Date(s) unknown. Photographer(s) unknown.

Download figure to PowerPoint

Chestnut Bunting Emberiza rutila

Delete from Category D; move to Category E.

Eight records from the period 1974–2002 were considered, two in September and the rest in May–July; the occurrence patterns were quite different from those of any other accepted far-eastern vagrants, and in particular the two September records occurred earlier than would be expected of genuine vagrants; there are accepted Western Palearctic records of first-winter birds of this species in October and November, and the Committee would consider any such record seriously.

Blue Grosbeak Passerina caerulea

Delete from Category D; move to Category E.

Four records: adult male, Out Skerries, Shetland, 23–26 August 1970; adult male, Highland, 10–11 March 1972; male, Borders, 22 May 1977; one Gloucestershire, 9 May 1986. It was established during the review that there are no other accepted Western Palearctic records. Blue Grosbeaks were known to be in trade in Britain during the 1970s. The Out Skerries bird was an adult, on a very early date for a natural autumn arrival, without other North American species and in the absence of a favourable weather pattern. The Highland bird was an adult male (not immature as published in British Birds 66: 360), but the plumage (especially the brown head) and date were considered anomalous for a natural vagrant (P. Pyle in litt.). The Borders bird was recorded in an exceptional late May period which brought a Yellow-rumped Warbler Dendroica coronata, a Dark-eyed Junco Junco hyemalis and two White-crowned Sparrows Zonotrichia leucophrys to Britain. It therefore would otherwise have had a strong case for consideration as a wild bird, but unfortunately it was assumed to be an escape so no description or photographs were obtained and the corpse was discarded. The Committee was unable to obtain further details of the Gloucestershire bird.

Files under consideration

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

Baikal Teal Anas formosa

All British records are under review in light of stable isotope evidence for vagrancy to western Europe (Denmark, November 2005).

Pacific Diver Gavia pacifica

Harrogate, North Yorkshire, prior to 29 January to 4 February 2007.

Yellow-nosed Albatross Thalassarche chlororhynchos

Brean, Somerset, 29–30 June 2007; same, Manton, near Messingham, Lincolnshire, 2–3 July 2007.

Madeiran Storm-petrel (Band-rumped Storm Petrel) Oceanodroma castro

Off Isles of Scilly, 28 July 2007.

The taxonomy is currently being reviewed by the Taxonomic Sub-Committee.

Great White Pelican Pelecanus onocrotalus

Review of Category D records from Norfolk, 1964, 1975 and 2006.

Saker Falco cherrug

Review of Category D records from 1976, 1978 and 1986.

Glaucous-winged Gull Larus glaucescens

Gloucester Landfill, Gloucestershire, 15–16 December 2006; same Tywi Estuary, Carmarthen, 2–3 and 5 March 2007; same Beddington SF, Surrey, 18 April 2007.

Hawk Owl (Northern Hawk-owl) Surnia ulula

All British records are being reviewed to establish first acceptable records of nominate ulula and caparoch.

Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava

Five specimen records of M. f. beema (‘Sykes's Wagtail’) are under review to determine the first acceptable British record. The two British occurrences of M. f. simillima (specimen records from Fair Isle in 1909 and 1912) are also under review.

White Wagtail Motacilla alba leucopsis

Seaham, Co. Durham, 5 April 2005.

Asian Brown Flycatcher Muscicapa dauurica

Review of Category D records from Fair Isle, 1992 and Flamborough, East Yorkshire, 2007.

Mugimaki Flycatcher Ficedula mugimaki

Review of Category D record from Stone Creek, Humberside, 1991.

Willow Tit Poecile montana

Investigations are continuing into the validity of records of Northern Willow Tit P. m. borealis. The first occurrence is a specimen record from Tetbury, Gloucestershire, March 1907 (skin at NHM, Tring).

Brown Shrike Lanius cristatus

Review of record from Whalsay, Shetland, September 2004 for possible acceptance as nominate cristatus; earlier records have been ‘race undetermined’.

Isabelline Shrike Lanius isabellinus

Records are being reviewed to establish the first acceptable records of nominate isabellinus and phoenicuroides.

Red-headed Bunting Emberiza bruniceps

Review of Category D records from Fair Isle, 1985, Fair Isle, 1997 and Monreith, Dumfries and Galloway, 2004.

Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

(Previous Errata and corrections appeared in Ibis 149: 194–197, 652–654.)

For the avoidance of doubt, the initials of authors of the following scientific names should be noted:

Mute Swan Cygnus olor (J.F. Gmelin)

American Wigeon Anas americana J.F. Gmelin

Green-winged Teal A. carolinensis J.F. Gmelin

Barrow's Goldeneye Bucephala islandica (J.F. Gmelin)

Yellow-billed Diver Gavia adamsii (G.R. Gray)

Sooty Shearwater Puffinus griseus (J.F. Gmelin)

Short-toed Eagle Circaetus gallicus (J.F. Gmelin)

Pallid Harrier Circus macrourus (J.F. Gmelin)

American Coot Fulica americana J.F. Gmelin

Pacific Golden Plover Pluvialis fulva (J.F. Gmelin)

Short-billed Dowitcher Limnodromus griseus (J.F. Gmelin)

Greater Yellowlegs Tringa melanoleuca (J.F. Gmelin)

Lesser Yellowlegs Tringa flavipes (J.F. Gmelin)

Ancient Murrelet Synthliboramphus antiquus (J.F. Gmelin)

Common Eider Somateria mollissima

Delete ssp. borealis from Category A of the British List (transferred inadvertently from Category D, formerly D3). Claimed records will be reviewed for possible admission to Category A.

Smew Mergellus albellus

Author of albellus should be: (Linnaeus)

Merlin Falco columbarius

Reinstate:

PM WM subaesalon Brehm

(omitted in error)

Bridled Tern Onychoprion anaethetus

Delete reference to subspecies anaethetus; substitute with V antarcticus (Lesson) (changed in error)

Common Guillemot Uria aalge

Delete ssp. hyperborea from Category A of the British List (transferred inadvertently from Category D, formerly D3). Claimed records will be reviewed for possible admission to Category A.

Little Auk Alle alle

Delete ssp. polaris from Category A of the British List (transferred inadvertently from Category D, formerly D3). Claimed records will be reviewed for possible admission to Category A.

Stonechat Saxicola torquatus

Delete reference to subspecies stejnegeri; substitute with V maurus (Pallas) or stejnegeri (Parrot). One record: adult male, Cley, Norfolk, May 1972. (changed in error) A review of this and other records of ‘eastern Stonechats’ is planned.

Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

Bradshaw, C. & McGowan, R.Y. 2008. BBRC and BOURC Chairmen's comments on ‘Mourning Dove on North Uist: new to Britain’. Brit. Birds 101: 29–30.

Bradshaw, C. & McGowan, R.Y. 2008. BBRC and BOURC Chairmen's comments on ‘Olive-tree Warbler in Shetland: new to Britain.’Brit. Birds 101: 88.

Bradshaw, C. & McGowan, R.Y. 2008. BBRC and BOURC Chairmen's comments on ‘Long-billed Murrelet in Devon: new to Britain.’Brit. Birds 101: 136.

Bradshaw, C. & McGowan, R.Y. 2008. BBRC and BOURC Chairmen's comments on ‘Chestnut-eared Bunting on Fair Isle: new to Britain.’Brit. Birds 101: 240.

Collinson, J.M. & Melling, T. 2008. Identification of vagrant Iberian Chiffchaffs - pointers, pitfalls and problem birds. British Birds 101: 174–188.

Collinson, M., McGowan, R.Y., Melling, T. & Harrop, A. on behalf of BOURC. 2008. [Editorial comment on] A Kermadec Petrel, taxidermists, and judging old records. Brit. Birds 101: 322–334.

Collinson, J.M., Parkin, D.T., Knox, A.G., Sangster, G. & Svensson, L. 2008. Species boundaries in the Herring and Lesser Black-backed Gull complex. Brit. Birds 101: 340–363.

Harrop, A.H.J., Knox, A.G. & McGowan, R.Y. on behalf of the British Ornithologists’ Union Records Committee. 2007. Britain's first Two-barred Crossbill. Brit. Birds 100: 650–657.

Knox, A.G., Collinson, M.J., Parkin, D.T., Sangster, G. & Svensson, L. 2008. Taxonomic recommendations for British birds: Fifth report. Ibis 150: 833–835.

Melling, T., McGowan, R.Y. & Lewington, I. 2008. The Dorset Yellow Bittern. Brit. Birds 101: 137–141.

Melling, T. 2008. Should Kermadec Petrel be on the British List? Brit. Birds 101: 31–38.

Melling, T. 2008. [Editorial comment on] The Cheshire Kermadec Petrel. Brit. Birds 101: 213.

Melling, T., Dudley, S. & Doherty, P. 2008. The Eagle Owl in Britain. Brit. Birds 101: 478–490.

McGowan, R.Y. & Rowlands, A. 2008. BBRC and BOURC Chairmen's comments on ‘Magnificent Frigatebird in Shropshire: new to Britain.’Brit. Birds 101: 321.

Acknowledgements

  1. Top of page
  2. BOU website: http://www.bou.org.uk
  3. Changes to the British List
  4. Taxonomy
  5. British List totals
  6. Category D review
  7. Consideration of species for elevation to Category C
  8. Files under consideration
  9. Category F Sub-Committee
  10. Errata: The British List: A Checklist of the Birds of Britain (7th edition)
  11. Publications by members of the BOURC, members of the BOURC-TSC, members of the BOURC-CFSC and BOU staff relating to the British List since the 36th Report
  12. Acknowledgements

The Committee could not operate successfully without the considerable help it receives from many people. We particularly wish to thank Mark Adams (Bird Group, Natural History Museum), Peter Castell, Walter Chapman, Katrina Cook (Bird Group, Natural History Museum), Andrea Corso, Steve Dudley (BOU Senior Administrator), Peter de Knijff, Alan Knox (University of Aberdeen), Eric Morton (Hancock Museum), Ray Murray, Keith Naylor, Robert Prŷs-Jones (Bird Group, Natural History Museum), Peter Pyle, Don Stenhouse (Bolton Museum and Archive Service) and Lars Svensson.

Committee membership (October 2007–September 2008)

Bob McGowan (Chairman) Andrew Harrop (Secretary) Andy Brown Martin Collinson Chris Kehoe Andrew Lassey Tim Melling Steve Votier Richard Millington Adam Rowlands (BBRC Representative) Roger Wilkinson (Captive bird/Bird Trade Consultant)