• Open Access

A life course perspective on telomere length and social inequalities in aging

Authors

  • Diana Kuh

    1. MRC National Survey of Health and Development, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Royal Free and University College London Medical School, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Diana Kuh, MRC National Survey of Health and Development, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Royal Free and University College London Medical School, 1-19 Torrington Place, London WC1E 6BT, UK, Tel.: 0044 (0)20 7679 1735; fax: 0044 (0)20 7679 5963; e-mail: d.kuh@nshd.mrc.ac.uk

Summary

Longitudinal studies will be needed to test the idea that social class in adult life, or in childhood, influences the rate of change in telomere length in peripheral blood samples.

Ancillary