Innovations in Practice: Empowering Parents, Empowering Communities: A pilot evaluation of a peer-led parenting programme

Authors

  • Crispin Day,

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Michael Rutter Centre, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AZ, UK
    2. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Research Unit, Department of Psychology (P078), Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: stacey.thomson@kcl.ac.uk
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  • Daniel Michelson,

    1. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Research Unit, Department of Psychology (P078), Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: stacey.thomson@kcl.ac.uk
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  • Stacey Thomson,

    1. Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services (CAMHS) Research Unit, Department of Psychology (P078), Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AF, UK. E-mail: stacey.thomson@kcl.ac.uk
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  • Caroline Penney,

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Michael Rutter Centre, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AZ, UK
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  • Lucy Draper

    1. Centre for Parent and Child Support, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, Michael Rutter Centre, De Crespigny Park, London SE5 8AZ, UK
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Abstract

Background:  Efficacious parenting interventions are under-utilised in mainstream services. Empowering Parents, Empowering Communities (EPEC) aims to increase community access to effective parenting support through a peer-led manualised intervention.

Method:  Training outcomes, clinical effectiveness and acceptability of EPEC were evaluated using a pre-post cohort design. Data were collected from trained peer facilitators (n=31) and parenting group participants (n=73).

Results:  Peer facilitators demonstrated significantly increased knowledge of and confidence in delivering parenting groups. Parents attending groups reported improvements in child behaviour and parenting stress, and high satisfaction.

Conclusions:  Early evidence suggests that EPEC may be an effective and acceptable service model in socially disadvantaged communities.

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