CHARACTERIZATION OF LATE CHALCOLITHIC MICRO-BEADS FROM ÇAMLIBEL TARLASI, NORTH-CENTRAL ANATOLIA

Authors

  • C. PICKARD,

    Corresponding author
    1. Archaeology, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, William Robertson Wing, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, UK
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  • U.-D. SCHOOP

    1. Archaeology, School of History, Classics and Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, William Robertson Wing, Old Medical School, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, UK
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email Catriona.Pickard@ed.ac.uk

Abstract

Micro-bead manufacture is geographically widespread from the fifth millennium bc. Previous studies of comparable micro-beads from sites in the Indus Valley region and the Near East suggest that many of these beads were formed from synthetic enstatite. Characterization of micro-beads from the Late Chalcolithic site of Çamlıbel Tarlası was carried out by optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microanalysis with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD). The chemical composition of the micro-beads analysed indicated that they were made from three distinctive materials; namely, bulk talc (i.e., synthetic enstatite precursor), apatite and mineral-rich clay pastes.

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