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Keywords:

  • EARLY NEOLITHIC;
  • LINEAR POTTERY CULTURE;
  • WELL;
  • ARCHAEOSEDIMENTS;
  • GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS;
  • SAXONY;
  • GERMANY

The discovery of wells of the linear pottery culture since 1990 has led to new insights on the ability and needs of humans at this time. The still small number of about 20 wells in Europe, compared to the much greater number of known settlements of this period, led to the assumption that they were built for special purposes, other than the water supply for the whole village. Investigations on the origin of archaeosediments of a more than 7000-year-old and 4.2 m deep well from the linear pottery culture in north-west Saxony, Germany were carried out by geochemical analysis to improve our knowledge of the building, the usage and the decay of this wooden construction. Special emphasis was put on the material around two 10-week-old piglets that were intentionally deposited in the construction pit. Three major units—the sediment in the well, the infilling of the construction pit and the surrounding gravels—influenced by lateral transport of fine clay could be identified and described.