RECENT STUDIES IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION, c. 1590–c. 1660
Part 1: General Studies and Translations from Greek and Latin

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Abstract

This essay continues my “Recent Studies in English Translation, c. 1520–c. 1590,” *ELR* 37 (2007), 274–316. For reasons of length, it has been divided into two parts and published in two separate issues of *ELR* 39 (2009). Part 1 begins with a few additions to the listing of general studies of issues in translation given in the previous essay; the greater part of it treats studies of translations from Greek and Latin (both ancient and modern). Greek and Latin have been presented separately, an arrangement that reflects the increased importance of major Greek writers in the seventeenth century. Part 2 covers studies of translations from Dutch, German, French, Italian, Spanish, and Portuguese. Both Part 1 and Part 2 include (sometimes anachronistically) a few items overlooked in the 2007 essay. As before, the material is organized around source languages, and issues of intermediate translation are left aside.

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