Get access

Developing a Nursing Database System in Kenya

Authors

  • Patricia L. Riley,

    1. Coordinating Office for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Mail Stop E-41, Atlanta, GA 30333,
    2. The Lillian Carter Center for International Nursing, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
    • Address correspondence to Patricia L. Riley, C.N.M., M.P.H., Coordinating Office for Global Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Mail Stop E-41, Atlanta, GA 30333. Stephen M. Vindigni, M.P.H., is with the National Center for Environmental Health, CDC, Atlanta, GA. Patricia L. Riley, C.N.M., M.P.H., adjunct faculty, and Agnes N. Waudo, H.S.C., R.N., R.M., In-Country Project Director, are with the The Lillian Carter Center for International Nursing, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. John Arudo, B.S.N., M.P.H., M.Sc., Lecturer, is with the Advanced Nursing Studies Programme, Aga Khan University, Nairobi, Kenya. Andrew Kamenju, Managing Consultant, is with Avid Information Technology Consultants, Nairobi, Kenya. Japheth Ngoya, Technical Director, is with Computer Action Networks, Nairobi, Kenya. Elizabeth O. Oywer, R.N., Registrar, is with the Nursing Council of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya. Chris P. Rakuom, B.Sc.N., R.N., R.M., I.C.U.N., Chief Nursing Officer, is with the Ministry of Health, Kenya Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya. Marla E. Salmon, Sc.D., R.N., F.A.A.N., Dean and Professor, and Martha Rogers, M.D., Professor, are with the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Maureen Kelley, C.N.M., Ph.D., Clinical Associate Professor and Chair, is with the Department of Family and Community Nursing, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA. Michael E. St. Louis, M.D., Officer for Science and Global Public Health, Coordinating Office for Global Health, and Lawrence H. Marum, M.D., M.P.H., Medical Epidemiologist, Global AIDS Program, are with the CDC, Atlanta, GA.

  • Stephen M. Vindigni,

    1. National Center for Environmental Health, CDC, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • John Arudo,

    1. Advanced Nursing Studies Programme, Aga Khan University, Nairobi, Kenya,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Agnes N. Waudo,

    1. The Lillian Carter Center for International Nursing, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Andrew Kamenju,

    1. Avid Information Technology Consultants, Nairobi, Kenya,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Japheth Ngoya,

    1. Computer Action Networks, Nairobi, Kenya,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Elizabeth O. Oywer,

    1. Nursing Council of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Chris P. Rakuom,

    1. Ministry of Health, Kenya Ministry of Health, Nairobi, Kenya,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Marla E. Salmon,

    1. Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Maureen Kelley,

    1. Department of Family and Community Nursing, Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Martha Rogers,

    1. Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, GA,
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Michael E. St. Louis,

    1. Officer for Science and Global Public Health, Coordinating Office for Global Health
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lawrence H. Marum

    1. CDC, Atlanta, GA.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Objective. To describe the development, initial findings, and implications of a national nursing workforce database system in Kenya.

Principal Findings. Creating a national electronic nursing workforce database provides more reliable information on nurse demographics, migration patterns, and workforce capacity. Data analyses are most useful for human resources for health (HRH) planning when workforce capacity data can be linked to worksite staffing requirements. As a result of establishing this database, the Kenya Ministry of Health has improved capability to assess its nursing workforce and document important workforce trends, such as out-migration. Current data identify the United States as the leading recipient country of Kenyan nurses. The overwhelming majority of Kenyan nurses who elect to out-migrate are among Kenya's most qualified.

Conclusions. The Kenya nursing database is a first step toward facilitating evidence-based decision making in HRH. This database is unique to developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa. Establishing an electronic workforce database requires long-term investment and sustained support by national and global stakeholders.

Ancillary