Physician Characteristics and the Reported Effect of Evidence-Based Practice Guidelines

Authors

  • Christine E. Sammer,

    1. 633 Cardinal Ridge, Burleson, TX 76028,
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    • Address correspondence to Christine E. Sammer, M.P.H., R.N., 633 Cardinal Ridge, Burleson, TX 76028. Kristine Lykens, Ph.D., Department of Health Management and Policy, and Karan P. Singh, Ph.D., Department of Biostatistics, are with the University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107.

  • Kristine Lykens,

    1. Department of Health Management and Policy, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107
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  • Karan P. Singh

    1. Department of Biostatistics, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth, TX 76107
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Abstract

Objective. To explore characteristics that may contribute to the effect practice guidelines have on the practice of medicine.

Data Sources. From the third round of the Community Tracking Study, Physician Survey, 2000–2001.

Study Design. An ordinal logistic regression model was estimated to capture the full range of responses.

Principal Findings. Recent medical school graduates, women, minorities, ob-gyn specialists, physicians who use computers for information in their practices, and physicians in nonsolo practice types were significantly more likely to state practice guidelines had an effect on their practice.

Conclusions. Many barriers have prevented wide acceptance of practice guidelines among the medical community. Our findings suggest there will be positive results on guideline effects as recent graduates, women, and minorities enter the physician workforce.

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